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Analysis of the method for conversion between levels of HbA1c and glycated albumin by linear regression analysis using a measurement error model.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2009 Jun; 84(3):224-9.DR

Abstract

AIM

To establish a method for conversion between HbA(1c) and glycated albumin (GA) using a measurement error model (MEM).

METHODS

Type 2 diabetic patients, without complications that might affect either HbA(1c) or GA, were enrolled in the study (n=154, age 68.4+/-9.9). HbA(1c), GA and postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) levels were measured simultaneously on >or=3 occasions.

RESULTS

PPG showed a significant correlation with HbA(1c) and GA (p<0.001 for both). Correlation between HbA(1c) and GA was very high (r=0.747, p<0.001). When the independent variable was assumed to be GA, common regression analysis yielded a regression line HbA(1c)=2.59+0.204GA. When the independent variable was changed to HbA(1c), the regression line became GA=2.26+2.74HbA(1c). The y-intercept of the first line was significantly positive, whereas that of the second was not. The regression line using MEM was HbA(1c)=1.73+0.245GA. The y-intercept was 1.73+/-0.38 (p<0.001) and the slope was 0.245+/-0.018 (p<0.001), showing that 1% increase in HbA(1c) level corresponds to 4% increase in GA level.

CONCLUSIONS

The relationship between HbA(1c) and GA was examined by regression analysis using MEM. HbA(1c) levels in Japan appear to have a positive shift of approximately 1.7%. Incremental ratio 4 of GA vs. HbA(1c) showed good consistency with values derived from in vitro data.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Meimai Central Hospital, Internal Medicine, Diabetes Division, Akashi, Hyogo, Japan. ystahara.dmdr@zeus.eonet.ne.jp

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19380169

Citation

Tahara, Yasuhiro. "Analysis of the Method for Conversion Between Levels of HbA1c and Glycated Albumin By Linear Regression Analysis Using a Measurement Error Model." Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, vol. 84, no. 3, 2009, pp. 224-9.
Tahara Y. Analysis of the method for conversion between levels of HbA1c and glycated albumin by linear regression analysis using a measurement error model. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2009;84(3):224-9.
Tahara, Y. (2009). Analysis of the method for conversion between levels of HbA1c and glycated albumin by linear regression analysis using a measurement error model. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 84(3), 224-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2009.03.014
Tahara Y. Analysis of the Method for Conversion Between Levels of HbA1c and Glycated Albumin By Linear Regression Analysis Using a Measurement Error Model. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2009;84(3):224-9. PubMed PMID: 19380169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of the method for conversion between levels of HbA1c and glycated albumin by linear regression analysis using a measurement error model. A1 - Tahara,Yasuhiro, Y1 - 2009/04/19/ PY - 2008/08/16/received PY - 2009/03/16/revised PY - 2009/03/19/accepted PY - 2009/4/22/entrez PY - 2009/4/22/pubmed PY - 2009/9/17/medline SP - 224 EP - 9 JF - Diabetes research and clinical practice JO - Diabetes Res Clin Pract VL - 84 IS - 3 N2 - AIM: To establish a method for conversion between HbA(1c) and glycated albumin (GA) using a measurement error model (MEM). METHODS: Type 2 diabetic patients, without complications that might affect either HbA(1c) or GA, were enrolled in the study (n=154, age 68.4+/-9.9). HbA(1c), GA and postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) levels were measured simultaneously on >or=3 occasions. RESULTS: PPG showed a significant correlation with HbA(1c) and GA (p<0.001 for both). Correlation between HbA(1c) and GA was very high (r=0.747, p<0.001). When the independent variable was assumed to be GA, common regression analysis yielded a regression line HbA(1c)=2.59+0.204GA. When the independent variable was changed to HbA(1c), the regression line became GA=2.26+2.74HbA(1c). The y-intercept of the first line was significantly positive, whereas that of the second was not. The regression line using MEM was HbA(1c)=1.73+0.245GA. The y-intercept was 1.73+/-0.38 (p<0.001) and the slope was 0.245+/-0.018 (p<0.001), showing that 1% increase in HbA(1c) level corresponds to 4% increase in GA level. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship between HbA(1c) and GA was examined by regression analysis using MEM. HbA(1c) levels in Japan appear to have a positive shift of approximately 1.7%. Incremental ratio 4 of GA vs. HbA(1c) showed good consistency with values derived from in vitro data. SN - 1872-8227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19380169/Analysis_of_the_method_for_conversion_between_levels_of_HbA1c_and_glycated_albumin_by_linear_regression_analysis_using_a_measurement_error_model_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-8227(09)00129-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -