Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bidirectional association of anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal carcinomas in men.
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2009; 135(4):402-5AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test the hypothesis of a bidirectional association of anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers in men.

DESIGN

Population-based epidemiological study using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer database.

SETTING

Population-based cancer study involving patients receiving care in the United States.

PARTICIPANTS

The study included 47,308 men 20 years and older with an index oral cavity/pharyngeal or anogenital cancer.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Second primary HPV-associated cancers (anogenital or oral cavity/pharyngeal) or HPV-unrelated cancers (prostate, bladder, or colon).

RESULTS

The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was elevated for both anogenital cancer following oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer (SIR, 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.7) and oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer following anogenital cancer (SIR, 3.0; 95% CI, 2.1-4.2). The increase in SIR was most pronounced for tonsillar cancer following anal cancer (SIR, 8.4; 95% CI, 2.7-19.6). The risk of second primary HPV-associated cancers did not vary significantly by age, race, year of diagnosis, or geographic location but was greater among never-married men, particularly for anal cancer following oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer (SIR, 6.5; 95% CI,1.8-16.7 in never-married men, but SIR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.1 in ever-married men) and for tonsillar cancer following anogenital cancer (SIR, 13.0; 95% CI, 3.5-33.2 in never-married men, but SIR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.0-9.7 in ever-married men). Other than a slightly increased risk of tongue cancer following colon cancer (SIR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6), there was no increased risk of oral cavity/pharyngeal or anogenital cancer following HPV-unrelated cancers or vice versa.

CONCLUSION

The association between index and second primary anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal cancers, strongest in never-married men, supports the influence of sexual behavior on the risk of HPV-associated head and neck cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1189, New York, NY 10029, USA. agsikora@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19380365

Citation

Sikora, Andrew G., et al. "Bidirectional Association of Anogenital and Oral Cavity/pharyngeal Carcinomas in Men." Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery, vol. 135, no. 4, 2009, pp. 402-5.
Sikora AG, Morris LG, Sturgis EM. Bidirectional association of anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal carcinomas in men. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009;135(4):402-5.
Sikora, A. G., Morris, L. G., & Sturgis, E. M. (2009). Bidirectional association of anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal carcinomas in men. Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery, 135(4), pp. 402-5. doi:10.1001/archoto.2009.19.
Sikora AG, Morris LG, Sturgis EM. Bidirectional Association of Anogenital and Oral Cavity/pharyngeal Carcinomas in Men. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009;135(4):402-5. PubMed PMID: 19380365.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bidirectional association of anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal carcinomas in men. AU - Sikora,Andrew G, AU - Morris,Luc G, AU - Sturgis,Erich M, PY - 2009/4/22/entrez PY - 2009/4/22/pubmed PY - 2009/5/29/medline SP - 402 EP - 5 JF - Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery JO - Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. VL - 135 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis of a bidirectional association of anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers in men. DESIGN: Population-based epidemiological study using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer database. SETTING: Population-based cancer study involving patients receiving care in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: The study included 47,308 men 20 years and older with an index oral cavity/pharyngeal or anogenital cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Second primary HPV-associated cancers (anogenital or oral cavity/pharyngeal) or HPV-unrelated cancers (prostate, bladder, or colon). RESULTS: The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was elevated for both anogenital cancer following oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer (SIR, 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.7) and oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer following anogenital cancer (SIR, 3.0; 95% CI, 2.1-4.2). The increase in SIR was most pronounced for tonsillar cancer following anal cancer (SIR, 8.4; 95% CI, 2.7-19.6). The risk of second primary HPV-associated cancers did not vary significantly by age, race, year of diagnosis, or geographic location but was greater among never-married men, particularly for anal cancer following oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer (SIR, 6.5; 95% CI,1.8-16.7 in never-married men, but SIR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.1 in ever-married men) and for tonsillar cancer following anogenital cancer (SIR, 13.0; 95% CI, 3.5-33.2 in never-married men, but SIR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.0-9.7 in ever-married men). Other than a slightly increased risk of tongue cancer following colon cancer (SIR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6), there was no increased risk of oral cavity/pharyngeal or anogenital cancer following HPV-unrelated cancers or vice versa. CONCLUSION: The association between index and second primary anogenital and oral cavity/pharyngeal cancers, strongest in never-married men, supports the influence of sexual behavior on the risk of HPV-associated head and neck cancers. SN - 1538-361X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19380365/Bidirectional_association_of_anogenital_and_oral_cavity/pharyngeal_carcinomas_in_men_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/archoto.2009.19 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -