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Early oxygen uptake recovery following exercise testing in children with chronic chest diseases.

Abstract

The value of exercise testing as an objective measure of disease severity in patients with chronic chest diseases (CCD) is becoming increasingly recognized. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in oxygen uptake (VO2) during early recovery following maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPXT) in relation to functional capacity and markers of disease severity. Twenty-seven children with CCD (age 12.7 +/- 3.1 years; 17 female) [19 children with Cystic fibrosis (CF) (age 13.4 +/- 3.1 years; 10 female) and 8 with other stable non-CF chest diseases (NON-CF) (age 11.1 +/- 2.2 years; 7 female)] and 27 healthy controls (age 13.2 +/- 3.3 years; 17 female) underwent CPXT on a cycle ergometer. On-line respiratory gas analysis measured VO2 before and during CPXT to peak VO2) (VO2(peak)), and during the first 10 min of recovery. Early VO2 recovery was quantified by the time (sec) to reach 50% of the VO2 (peak) value. Early VO2 recovery was correlated against spirometry [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75))] and aerobic fitness (VO2)(peak)) as a measure of functional capacity. Disease severity was graded in the CF patients by the Shwachman score (SS). Compared to controls, children with CCD demonstrated a significantly reduced VO2(peak) (P = 0.011), FEV(1) (P < 0.001), FEF(25-75) (P < 0.001), and a significantly prolonged early (VO2) recovery (P = 0.024). In the CF patients the SS was significantly correlated with early VO2 recovery (r = -0.63, P = 0.004), FEV(1) (r = 0.72, P = 0.001), and FEF(25-75) (r = 0.57, P = 0.011). In the children with CCD, FEV(1), FEF(25-75), and BMI were not significantly correlated with VO2(peak) or early VO2 recovery. Lung function does not necessarily reflect aerobic fitness and the ability to recover from exercise in these patients. A significant relationship was found between VO2(peak) and early VO2 recovery (r = -0.39, P = 0.044) in the children with CCD, showing that a greater aerobic fitness corresponded with a faster recovery.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Children's Health and Exercise Research Centre, School of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, Devon, UK.

    , ,

    Source

    Pediatric pulmonology 44:5 2009 May pg 480-8

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Bronchiectasis
    Case-Control Studies
    Child
    Cystic Fibrosis
    Exercise Test
    Exercise Tolerance
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Oxygen Consumption
    Pulmonary Ventilation

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19382220

    Citation

    Stevens, D, et al. "Early Oxygen Uptake Recovery Following Exercise Testing in Children With Chronic Chest Diseases." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 44, no. 5, 2009, pp. 480-8.
    Stevens D, Oades PJ, Armstrong N, et al. Early oxygen uptake recovery following exercise testing in children with chronic chest diseases. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2009;44(5):480-8.
    Stevens, D., Oades, P. J., Armstrong, N., & Williams, C. A. (2009). Early oxygen uptake recovery following exercise testing in children with chronic chest diseases. Pediatric Pulmonology, 44(5), pp. 480-8. doi:10.1002/ppul.21024.
    Stevens D, et al. Early Oxygen Uptake Recovery Following Exercise Testing in Children With Chronic Chest Diseases. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2009;44(5):480-8. PubMed PMID: 19382220.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Early oxygen uptake recovery following exercise testing in children with chronic chest diseases. AU - Stevens,D, AU - Oades,P J, AU - Armstrong,N, AU - Williams,C A, PY - 2009/4/22/entrez PY - 2009/4/22/pubmed PY - 2009/8/4/medline SP - 480 EP - 8 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr. Pulmonol. VL - 44 IS - 5 N2 - The value of exercise testing as an objective measure of disease severity in patients with chronic chest diseases (CCD) is becoming increasingly recognized. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in oxygen uptake (VO2) during early recovery following maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPXT) in relation to functional capacity and markers of disease severity. Twenty-seven children with CCD (age 12.7 +/- 3.1 years; 17 female) [19 children with Cystic fibrosis (CF) (age 13.4 +/- 3.1 years; 10 female) and 8 with other stable non-CF chest diseases (NON-CF) (age 11.1 +/- 2.2 years; 7 female)] and 27 healthy controls (age 13.2 +/- 3.3 years; 17 female) underwent CPXT on a cycle ergometer. On-line respiratory gas analysis measured VO2 before and during CPXT to peak VO2) (VO2(peak)), and during the first 10 min of recovery. Early VO2 recovery was quantified by the time (sec) to reach 50% of the VO2 (peak) value. Early VO2 recovery was correlated against spirometry [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75))] and aerobic fitness (VO2)(peak)) as a measure of functional capacity. Disease severity was graded in the CF patients by the Shwachman score (SS). Compared to controls, children with CCD demonstrated a significantly reduced VO2(peak) (P = 0.011), FEV(1) (P < 0.001), FEF(25-75) (P < 0.001), and a significantly prolonged early (VO2) recovery (P = 0.024). In the CF patients the SS was significantly correlated with early VO2 recovery (r = -0.63, P = 0.004), FEV(1) (r = 0.72, P = 0.001), and FEF(25-75) (r = 0.57, P = 0.011). In the children with CCD, FEV(1), FEF(25-75), and BMI were not significantly correlated with VO2(peak) or early VO2 recovery. Lung function does not necessarily reflect aerobic fitness and the ability to recover from exercise in these patients. A significant relationship was found between VO2(peak) and early VO2 recovery (r = -0.39, P = 0.044) in the children with CCD, showing that a greater aerobic fitness corresponded with a faster recovery. SN - 1099-0496 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19382220/Early_oxygen_uptake_recovery_following_exercise_testing_in_children_with_chronic_chest_diseases_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.21024 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -