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Does early review by a respiratory physician lead to a shorter length of stay for patients with non-severe community-acquired pneumonia?
Thorax. 2009 Aug; 64(8):709-12.T

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients with non-severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have a shorter length of stay (LOS) when initially seen by a respiratory physician compared with a non-respiratory physician.

METHODS

At Nottingham City Hospital, following nurse triage, acute medical patients who are not severely ill are admitted to the consultant-led emergency short stay unit (ESSU). Records of patients seen on ESSU between January 2004 and December 2007 with a clinical discharge code relating to CAP were retrospectively examined. Patients with a diagnosis of cellulitis over the same time period were used as controls. Patients were grouped depending on whether they were seen on their first post-take ward round by a respiratory consultant physician (group A), non-respiratory consultant physician (group B) or on a Saturday or Sunday (group C).

RESULTS

Following exclusions, 426 patients with CAP and 935 patients with cellulitis were analysed. The median LOS for patients with CAP in group A was 1.74 days (n = 123, interquartile range (IQR) 0.97-4.09) compared with 3.03 days for patients in group B (n = 174, IQR 1.12-6.23; p<0.01). There was a larger percentage of discharges within 24 h of consultant review in group A (43.1%) compared with group B (31.9%), although this was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). There was no statistically significant difference between groups A and B with cellulitis in LOS or percentage discharged within 24 h of first consultant review.

CONCLUSION

Patients with non-severe CAP have a shorter hospital LOS when initially seen by a respiratory compared with a non-respiratory physician.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nottingham City Hospital, 55 Stratford Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham, UK. thomasbewick@doctors.org.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19386582

Citation

Bewick, T, et al. "Does Early Review By a Respiratory Physician Lead to a Shorter Length of Stay for Patients With Non-severe Community-acquired Pneumonia?" Thorax, vol. 64, no. 8, 2009, pp. 709-12.
Bewick T, Cooper VJ, Lim WS. Does early review by a respiratory physician lead to a shorter length of stay for patients with non-severe community-acquired pneumonia? Thorax. 2009;64(8):709-12.
Bewick, T., Cooper, V. J., & Lim, W. S. (2009). Does early review by a respiratory physician lead to a shorter length of stay for patients with non-severe community-acquired pneumonia? Thorax, 64(8), 709-12. https://doi.org/10.1136/thx.2008.109983
Bewick T, Cooper VJ, Lim WS. Does Early Review By a Respiratory Physician Lead to a Shorter Length of Stay for Patients With Non-severe Community-acquired Pneumonia. Thorax. 2009;64(8):709-12. PubMed PMID: 19386582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does early review by a respiratory physician lead to a shorter length of stay for patients with non-severe community-acquired pneumonia? AU - Bewick,T, AU - Cooper,V J, AU - Lim,W S, Y1 - 2009/04/21/ PY - 2009/4/24/entrez PY - 2009/4/24/pubmed PY - 2009/12/23/medline SP - 709 EP - 12 JF - Thorax JO - Thorax VL - 64 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients with non-severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have a shorter length of stay (LOS) when initially seen by a respiratory physician compared with a non-respiratory physician. METHODS: At Nottingham City Hospital, following nurse triage, acute medical patients who are not severely ill are admitted to the consultant-led emergency short stay unit (ESSU). Records of patients seen on ESSU between January 2004 and December 2007 with a clinical discharge code relating to CAP were retrospectively examined. Patients with a diagnosis of cellulitis over the same time period were used as controls. Patients were grouped depending on whether they were seen on their first post-take ward round by a respiratory consultant physician (group A), non-respiratory consultant physician (group B) or on a Saturday or Sunday (group C). RESULTS: Following exclusions, 426 patients with CAP and 935 patients with cellulitis were analysed. The median LOS for patients with CAP in group A was 1.74 days (n = 123, interquartile range (IQR) 0.97-4.09) compared with 3.03 days for patients in group B (n = 174, IQR 1.12-6.23; p<0.01). There was a larger percentage of discharges within 24 h of consultant review in group A (43.1%) compared with group B (31.9%), although this was not statistically significant (p = 0.18). There was no statistically significant difference between groups A and B with cellulitis in LOS or percentage discharged within 24 h of first consultant review. CONCLUSION: Patients with non-severe CAP have a shorter hospital LOS when initially seen by a respiratory compared with a non-respiratory physician. SN - 1468-3296 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19386582/Does_early_review_by_a_respiratory_physician_lead_to_a_shorter_length_of_stay_for_patients_with_non_severe_community_acquired_pneumonia L2 - https://thorax.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19386582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -