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Evaluating the potential for enzymatic acrylamide mitigation in a range of food products using an asparaginase from Aspergillus oryzae.
J Agric Food Chem. 2009 May 27; 57(10):4168-76.JA

Abstract

Asparaginase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes asparagine to aspartic acid, presents a potentially very effective means for reducing acrylamide formation in foods via removal of the precursor, asparagine, from the primary ingredients. An extracellular asparaginase amenable to industrial production was cloned and expressed in Aspergillus oryzae . This asparaginase was tested in a range of food products, including semisweet biscuits, ginger biscuits, crisp bread, French fries, and sliced potato chips. In dough-based applications, addition of asparaginase resulted in reduction of acrylamide content in the final products of 34-92%. Enzyme dose, dough resting time, and water content were identified as critical parameters. Treating French fries and sliced potato chips was more challenging as the solid nature of these whole-cut products limits enzyme-substrate contact. However, by treating potato pieces with asparaginase after blanching, the acrylamide levels in French fries could be lowered by 60-85% and that in potato chips by up to 60%.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Novozymes A/S, Krogshoejvej 36, DK-2880 Bagsvaerd, Denmark. hvhe@novozymes.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19388639

Citation

Hendriksen, Hanne V., et al. "Evaluating the Potential for Enzymatic Acrylamide Mitigation in a Range of Food Products Using an Asparaginase From Aspergillus Oryzae." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 57, no. 10, 2009, pp. 4168-76.
Hendriksen HV, Kornbrust BA, Østergaard PR, et al. Evaluating the potential for enzymatic acrylamide mitigation in a range of food products using an asparaginase from Aspergillus oryzae. J Agric Food Chem. 2009;57(10):4168-76.
Hendriksen, H. V., Kornbrust, B. A., Østergaard, P. R., & Stringer, M. A. (2009). Evaluating the potential for enzymatic acrylamide mitigation in a range of food products using an asparaginase from Aspergillus oryzae. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 57(10), 4168-76. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf900174q
Hendriksen HV, et al. Evaluating the Potential for Enzymatic Acrylamide Mitigation in a Range of Food Products Using an Asparaginase From Aspergillus Oryzae. J Agric Food Chem. 2009 May 27;57(10):4168-76. PubMed PMID: 19388639.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluating the potential for enzymatic acrylamide mitigation in a range of food products using an asparaginase from Aspergillus oryzae. AU - Hendriksen,Hanne V, AU - Kornbrust,Beate A, AU - Østergaard,Peter R, AU - Stringer,Mary A, Y1 - 2009/04/23/ PY - 2009/4/25/entrez PY - 2009/4/25/pubmed PY - 2011/5/25/medline SP - 4168 EP - 76 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 57 IS - 10 N2 - Asparaginase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes asparagine to aspartic acid, presents a potentially very effective means for reducing acrylamide formation in foods via removal of the precursor, asparagine, from the primary ingredients. An extracellular asparaginase amenable to industrial production was cloned and expressed in Aspergillus oryzae . This asparaginase was tested in a range of food products, including semisweet biscuits, ginger biscuits, crisp bread, French fries, and sliced potato chips. In dough-based applications, addition of asparaginase resulted in reduction of acrylamide content in the final products of 34-92%. Enzyme dose, dough resting time, and water content were identified as critical parameters. Treating French fries and sliced potato chips was more challenging as the solid nature of these whole-cut products limits enzyme-substrate contact. However, by treating potato pieces with asparaginase after blanching, the acrylamide levels in French fries could be lowered by 60-85% and that in potato chips by up to 60%. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19388639/Evaluating_the_potential_for_enzymatic_acrylamide_mitigation_in_a_range_of_food_products_using_an_asparaginase_from_Aspergillus_oryzae_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf900174q DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -