Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Stereoscopic shape discrimination is well preserved across changes in object size.
Acta Psychol (Amst). 2009 Jun; 131(2):129-35.AP

Abstract

A single experiment evaluated human observers' ability to discriminate the shape of solid objects that varied in size and orientation in depth. The object shapes were defined by binocular disparity, Lambertian shading, and texture. The object surfaces were smoothly curved and had naturalistic shapes, resembling those of water-smoothed granite rocks. On any given trial, two objects were presented that were either the same or different in terms of shape. When the "same" objects were presented, they differed in their orientation in depth by 25 degrees , 45 degrees , or 65 degrees . The observers were required to judge whether any given pair of objects was the "same" or "different" in terms of shape. The size of the objects was also varied by amounts up to +/-40% relative to the standard size. The observers' shape discrimination performance was strongly affected by the magnitude of the orientation changes in depth - thus, their performance was viewpoint dependent. In contrast, the observers' shape discrimination abilities were only slightly affected by changes in the overall size of the objects. It appears that human observers can recognize the three-dimensional shape of objects in a manner that is relatively independent of size.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101-1030, United States. Farley.Norman@wku.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19389660

Citation

Norman, J Farley, et al. "Stereoscopic Shape Discrimination Is Well Preserved Across Changes in Object Size." Acta Psychologica, vol. 131, no. 2, 2009, pp. 129-35.
Norman JF, Swindle JM, Jennings LR, et al. Stereoscopic shape discrimination is well preserved across changes in object size. Acta Psychol (Amst). 2009;131(2):129-35.
Norman, J. F., Swindle, J. M., Jennings, L. R., Mullins, E. M., & Beers, A. M. (2009). Stereoscopic shape discrimination is well preserved across changes in object size. Acta Psychologica, 131(2), 129-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2009.03.009
Norman JF, et al. Stereoscopic Shape Discrimination Is Well Preserved Across Changes in Object Size. Acta Psychol (Amst). 2009;131(2):129-35. PubMed PMID: 19389660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stereoscopic shape discrimination is well preserved across changes in object size. AU - Norman,J Farley, AU - Swindle,Jessica M, AU - Jennings,L RaShae, AU - Mullins,Elizabeth M, AU - Beers,Amanda M, Y1 - 2009/04/22/ PY - 2008/12/03/received PY - 2009/03/19/revised PY - 2009/03/20/accepted PY - 2009/4/25/entrez PY - 2009/4/25/pubmed PY - 2009/8/28/medline SP - 129 EP - 35 JF - Acta psychologica JO - Acta Psychol (Amst) VL - 131 IS - 2 N2 - A single experiment evaluated human observers' ability to discriminate the shape of solid objects that varied in size and orientation in depth. The object shapes were defined by binocular disparity, Lambertian shading, and texture. The object surfaces were smoothly curved and had naturalistic shapes, resembling those of water-smoothed granite rocks. On any given trial, two objects were presented that were either the same or different in terms of shape. When the "same" objects were presented, they differed in their orientation in depth by 25 degrees , 45 degrees , or 65 degrees . The observers were required to judge whether any given pair of objects was the "same" or "different" in terms of shape. The size of the objects was also varied by amounts up to +/-40% relative to the standard size. The observers' shape discrimination performance was strongly affected by the magnitude of the orientation changes in depth - thus, their performance was viewpoint dependent. In contrast, the observers' shape discrimination abilities were only slightly affected by changes in the overall size of the objects. It appears that human observers can recognize the three-dimensional shape of objects in a manner that is relatively independent of size. SN - 1873-6297 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19389660/Stereoscopic_shape_discrimination_is_well_preserved_across_changes_in_object_size_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001-6918(09)00039-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -