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Sociodemographic differences in selected eating practices among alternative high school students.
J Am Diet Assoc 2009; 109(5):823-9JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Students attending alternative high schools are an at-risk group of youth for poor health behaviors and obesity. However, little is known about their dietary practices.

OBJECTIVE

To examine associations between sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status and selected dietary practices, including consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, high-fat foods, and fruits and vegetables and fast-food restaurant use, among students attending alternative high schools.

DESIGN

Population-based, cross-sectional study.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

A convenience sample of adolescents (n=145; 52% men; 63% aged <18 years; and 39% white, 32% African American, and 29% other/multiracial) attending six alternative high schools in the St Paul/Minneapolis, MN, metropolitan area completed a survey. Students were participants in the Team COOL (Controlling Overweight and Obesity for Life) pilot study, a group randomized obesity prevention trial.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Descriptive statistics were used to describe dietary practices. Mixed model multivariate analyses were used to assess differences in dietary practices by sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

RESULTS

Regular soda was consumed at least five to six times per week by more than half of students. One half of students reported eating or drinking something from a fast-food restaurant at least three to four times a week. African-American students had the highest consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (P=0.025), high-fat foods (P=0.002), and highest frequency of fast-food restaurant use (P<0.025). Mean fruit/vegetable intake was 3.6 servings/day; there were no sociodemographic differences in fruit/vegetable consumption. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with a higher consumption of regular soda (P=0.027).

CONCLUSIONS

Racial/ethnic and sex differences in the consumption of regular soda, high-fat foods, and fast-food restaurant use among alternative high school students underscores the importance of implementing health promotion programs in alternative high schools.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 S 2nd St, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. arca0021@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19394468

Citation

Arcan, Chrisa, et al. "Sociodemographic Differences in Selected Eating Practices Among Alternative High School Students." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 5, 2009, pp. 823-9.
Arcan C, Kubik MY, Fulkerson JA, et al. Sociodemographic differences in selected eating practices among alternative high school students. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(5):823-9.
Arcan, C., Kubik, M. Y., Fulkerson, J. A., & Story, M. (2009). Sociodemographic differences in selected eating practices among alternative high school students. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109(5), pp. 823-9. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2009.02.001.
Arcan C, et al. Sociodemographic Differences in Selected Eating Practices Among Alternative High School Students. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(5):823-9. PubMed PMID: 19394468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sociodemographic differences in selected eating practices among alternative high school students. AU - Arcan,Chrisa, AU - Kubik,Martha Y, AU - Fulkerson,Jayne A, AU - Story,Mary, PY - 2008/05/27/received PY - 2008/11/18/accepted PY - 2009/4/28/entrez PY - 2009/4/28/pubmed PY - 2009/5/14/medline SP - 823 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 109 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Students attending alternative high schools are an at-risk group of youth for poor health behaviors and obesity. However, little is known about their dietary practices. OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status and selected dietary practices, including consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, high-fat foods, and fruits and vegetables and fast-food restaurant use, among students attending alternative high schools. DESIGN: Population-based, cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS/SETTING: A convenience sample of adolescents (n=145; 52% men; 63% aged <18 years; and 39% white, 32% African American, and 29% other/multiracial) attending six alternative high schools in the St Paul/Minneapolis, MN, metropolitan area completed a survey. Students were participants in the Team COOL (Controlling Overweight and Obesity for Life) pilot study, a group randomized obesity prevention trial. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Descriptive statistics were used to describe dietary practices. Mixed model multivariate analyses were used to assess differences in dietary practices by sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: Regular soda was consumed at least five to six times per week by more than half of students. One half of students reported eating or drinking something from a fast-food restaurant at least three to four times a week. African-American students had the highest consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (P=0.025), high-fat foods (P=0.002), and highest frequency of fast-food restaurant use (P<0.025). Mean fruit/vegetable intake was 3.6 servings/day; there were no sociodemographic differences in fruit/vegetable consumption. Higher socioeconomic status was associated with a higher consumption of regular soda (P=0.027). CONCLUSIONS: Racial/ethnic and sex differences in the consumption of regular soda, high-fat foods, and fast-food restaurant use among alternative high school students underscores the importance of implementing health promotion programs in alternative high schools. SN - 1878-3570 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19394468/Sociodemographic_differences_in_selected_eating_practices_among_alternative_high_school_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(09)00147-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -