Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Influence of exogenous iron, calcium, protein and common salt on the bioaccessibility of zinc from cereals and legumes.

Abstract

We have earlier reported the zinc bioaccessibility from cereals and pulses and documented the influence of heat processing, germination and fermentation on the same. In the present study, we have assessed the influence of exogenous iron and calcium equivalent to their supplemental levels on the bioaccessibility of zinc from food grains that generally are the major components of meal in India. Bioaccessibility measurement was made by a procedure involving equilibrium dialysis during simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Exogenous iron equivalent to therapeutic levels (5mg per 10g of cereal-legume combination) significantly reduced the bioaccessibility of zinc from the food grains tested, the percent reduction being 32.4. Exogenous calcium equivalent to therapeutic levels (83mg per 10g of the cereal-legume combination) also significantly reduced (by 27.4%) the bioaccessibility of zinc from the tested food grains. The negative influence of exogenous iron and calcium was similar in both raw and cooked grains. Such negative influences on the bioaccessibility of zinc were however not seen when exogenous iron and calcium were only moderate (up to four times the intrinsic level). A study of the influence of exogenous protein on the bioaccessibility of zinc from food grains revealed that soy protein isolate added at amounts to result in a total protein content of 20% produced contrasting effects on zinc and iron bioaccessibility from cereals - rice and sorghum. While soy protein had a negative effect on iron bioaccessibility from these food grains, the same produced an enhancing effect on zinc bioaccessibility (an increase of 50% and 90% increase) from raw and cooked grain, respectively). Exogenous sodium chloride (at 5% level) potentiated the positive effect of soy protein on zinc bioaccessibility, and effectively countered its negative effect on iron bioaccessibility. The observed negative influence of supplemental iron and calcium on zinc bioaccessibility suggests that zinc supplementation may be necessary in the Indian context, whenever iron and calcium supplements are taken, to compensate for the reduction in zinc bioaccessibility.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Biological Availability
    Calcium
    Edible Grain
    Fabaceae
    Food, Fortified
    Hot Temperature
    India
    Iron
    Sodium Chloride
    Soybean Proteins
    Zinc

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19398054

    Citation

    Hemalatha, Sreeramaiah, et al. "Influence of Exogenous Iron, Calcium, Protein and Common Salt On the Bioaccessibility of Zinc From Cereals and Legumes." Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), vol. 23, no. 2, 2009, pp. 75-83.
    Hemalatha S, Gautam S, Platel K, et al. Influence of exogenous iron, calcium, protein and common salt on the bioaccessibility of zinc from cereals and legumes. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2009;23(2):75-83.
    Hemalatha, S., Gautam, S., Platel, K., & Srinivasan, K. (2009). Influence of exogenous iron, calcium, protein and common salt on the bioaccessibility of zinc from cereals and legumes. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), 23(2), pp. 75-83. doi:10.1016/j.jtemb.2009.01.005.
    Hemalatha S, et al. Influence of Exogenous Iron, Calcium, Protein and Common Salt On the Bioaccessibility of Zinc From Cereals and Legumes. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2009;23(2):75-83. PubMed PMID: 19398054.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of exogenous iron, calcium, protein and common salt on the bioaccessibility of zinc from cereals and legumes. AU - Hemalatha,Sreeramaiah, AU - Gautam,Smita, AU - Platel,Kalpana, AU - Srinivasan,Krishnapura, Y1 - 2009/03/24/ PY - 2007/05/14/received PY - 2008/09/28/revised PY - 2009/01/22/accepted PY - 2009/4/29/entrez PY - 2009/4/29/pubmed PY - 2009/7/10/medline SP - 75 EP - 83 JF - Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) JO - J Trace Elem Med Biol VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - We have earlier reported the zinc bioaccessibility from cereals and pulses and documented the influence of heat processing, germination and fermentation on the same. In the present study, we have assessed the influence of exogenous iron and calcium equivalent to their supplemental levels on the bioaccessibility of zinc from food grains that generally are the major components of meal in India. Bioaccessibility measurement was made by a procedure involving equilibrium dialysis during simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Exogenous iron equivalent to therapeutic levels (5mg per 10g of cereal-legume combination) significantly reduced the bioaccessibility of zinc from the food grains tested, the percent reduction being 32.4. Exogenous calcium equivalent to therapeutic levels (83mg per 10g of the cereal-legume combination) also significantly reduced (by 27.4%) the bioaccessibility of zinc from the tested food grains. The negative influence of exogenous iron and calcium was similar in both raw and cooked grains. Such negative influences on the bioaccessibility of zinc were however not seen when exogenous iron and calcium were only moderate (up to four times the intrinsic level). A study of the influence of exogenous protein on the bioaccessibility of zinc from food grains revealed that soy protein isolate added at amounts to result in a total protein content of 20% produced contrasting effects on zinc and iron bioaccessibility from cereals - rice and sorghum. While soy protein had a negative effect on iron bioaccessibility from these food grains, the same produced an enhancing effect on zinc bioaccessibility (an increase of 50% and 90% increase) from raw and cooked grain, respectively). Exogenous sodium chloride (at 5% level) potentiated the positive effect of soy protein on zinc bioaccessibility, and effectively countered its negative effect on iron bioaccessibility. The observed negative influence of supplemental iron and calcium on zinc bioaccessibility suggests that zinc supplementation may be necessary in the Indian context, whenever iron and calcium supplements are taken, to compensate for the reduction in zinc bioaccessibility. SN - 1878-3252 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19398054/Influence_of_exogenous_iron_calcium_protein_and_common_salt_on_the_bioaccessibility_of_zinc_from_cereals_and_legumes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0946-672X(09)00019-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -