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Current status of Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines in Japanese clinical practice guidelines.
Complement Ther Med. 2009 Jun; 17(3):147-54.CT

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines are often used in clinical practice in Japan. However, it is unclear how Kampo medicines are quoted and evaluated in current clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Here, we systematically reviewed Japanese CPGs, and aimed to reveal how Kampo medicines are described in the CPGs.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We reviewed the quasi-comprehensive list of Japanese CPGs available from the Toho University Medical Media Center (TUMMC) having the largest data base on Japanese CPGs, and also used a hand search. CPGs containing Kampo products were classified into three types based on how Kampo was handled. CPGs that provided recommendations based on evidence were classified as "type A". Those which cited references but did not provide any recommendations were classified as "type B". Those which described the Kampo practice or Kampo-related terms without providing any relevant references were classified as "type C".

RESULTS

By the end of March of 2007, 35 (10.1%) of 346 CPGs listed by TUMMC contained descriptions of Kampo products. We discovered one Kampo-related CPGs in a hand search process. Of these 36 CPGs, 6 were "type A", 13 were "type B", and 17 were "type C". Although results from pertinent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were available, we noticed that some well-known RCTs studying Kampo medicines are missing in corresponding CPGs.

CONCLUSIONS

We revealed that the citation rate of Kampo medicines in CPGs was approximately 10% and that some pivotal trials for Kampo medicines were not quoted in CPGs. Kampo medicines in CPGs should be assessed more comprehensively and scientifically.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG), Special Committee for EBM, Japan Society for Oriental Medicine, Japan. motoo@kanazawa-med.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19398068

Citation

Motoo, Yoshiharu, et al. "Current Status of Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicines in Japanese Clinical Practice Guidelines." Complementary Therapies in Medicine, vol. 17, no. 3, 2009, pp. 147-54.
Motoo Y, Arai I, Hyodo I, et al. Current status of Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines in Japanese clinical practice guidelines. Complement Ther Med. 2009;17(3):147-54.
Motoo, Y., Arai, I., Hyodo, I., & Tsutani, K. (2009). Current status of Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines in Japanese clinical practice guidelines. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 17(3), 147-54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2008.09.003
Motoo Y, et al. Current Status of Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicines in Japanese Clinical Practice Guidelines. Complement Ther Med. 2009;17(3):147-54. PubMed PMID: 19398068.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current status of Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines in Japanese clinical practice guidelines. AU - Motoo,Yoshiharu, AU - Arai,Ichiro, AU - Hyodo,Ichinosuke, AU - Tsutani,Kiichiro, Y1 - 2008/11/14/ PY - 2008/03/03/received PY - 2008/08/15/revised PY - 2008/09/02/accepted PY - 2009/4/29/entrez PY - 2009/4/29/pubmed PY - 2009/7/8/medline SP - 147 EP - 54 JF - Complementary therapies in medicine JO - Complement Ther Med VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines are often used in clinical practice in Japan. However, it is unclear how Kampo medicines are quoted and evaluated in current clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Here, we systematically reviewed Japanese CPGs, and aimed to reveal how Kampo medicines are described in the CPGs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the quasi-comprehensive list of Japanese CPGs available from the Toho University Medical Media Center (TUMMC) having the largest data base on Japanese CPGs, and also used a hand search. CPGs containing Kampo products were classified into three types based on how Kampo was handled. CPGs that provided recommendations based on evidence were classified as "type A". Those which cited references but did not provide any recommendations were classified as "type B". Those which described the Kampo practice or Kampo-related terms without providing any relevant references were classified as "type C". RESULTS: By the end of March of 2007, 35 (10.1%) of 346 CPGs listed by TUMMC contained descriptions of Kampo products. We discovered one Kampo-related CPGs in a hand search process. Of these 36 CPGs, 6 were "type A", 13 were "type B", and 17 were "type C". Although results from pertinent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were available, we noticed that some well-known RCTs studying Kampo medicines are missing in corresponding CPGs. CONCLUSIONS: We revealed that the citation rate of Kampo medicines in CPGs was approximately 10% and that some pivotal trials for Kampo medicines were not quoted in CPGs. Kampo medicines in CPGs should be assessed more comprehensively and scientifically. SN - 1873-6963 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19398068/Current_status_of_Kampo__Japanese_herbal__medicines_in_Japanese_clinical_practice_guidelines_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0965-2299(08)00120-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -