Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Recent decline in age at breast development: the Copenhagen Puberty Study.
Pediatrics. 2009 May; 123(5):e932-9.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Recent publications showing unexpectedly early breast development in American girls created debate worldwide. However, secular trend analyses are often limited by poor data comparability among studies performed by different researchers in different time periods and populations. Here we present new European data systematically collected from the same region and by 1 research group at the beginning and end of the recent 15-year period.

METHODS

Girls (N = 2095) aged 5.6 to 20.0 years were studied in 1991-1993 (1991 cohort; n = 1100) and 2006-2008 (2006 cohort; n = 995). All girls were evaluated by palpation of glandular breast, measurement of height and weight, and blood sampling (for estradiol, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone). Age distribution at entering pubertal breast stages 2 through 5, pubic hair stages 2 through 5, and menarche was estimated for the 2 cohorts.

RESULTS

Onset of puberty, defined as mean estimated age at attainment of glandular breast tissue (Tanner breast stage 2+), occurred significantly earlier in the 2006 cohort (estimated mean age: 9.86 years) when compared with the 1991 cohort (estimated mean age: 10.88 years). The difference remained significant after adjustment for BMI. Estimated ages at menarche were 13.42 and 13.13 years in the 1991 and 2006 cohorts, respectively. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone did not differ between the 2 cohorts at any age interval, whereas significantly lower estradiol levels were found in 8- to 10-year-old girls from the 2006 cohort compared with similarly aged girls from the 1991 cohort.

CONCLUSIONS

We found significantly earlier breast development among girls born more recently. Alterations in reproductive hormones and BMI did not explain these marked changes, which suggests that other factors yet to be identified may be involved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rigshospitalet, Department of Growth and Reproduction GR, Section 5064, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. lise.aksglaede@rh.hosp.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19403485

Citation

Aksglaede, Lise, et al. "Recent Decline in Age at Breast Development: the Copenhagen Puberty Study." Pediatrics, vol. 123, no. 5, 2009, pp. e932-9.
Aksglaede L, Sørensen K, Petersen JH, et al. Recent decline in age at breast development: the Copenhagen Puberty Study. Pediatrics. 2009;123(5):e932-9.
Aksglaede, L., Sørensen, K., Petersen, J. H., Skakkebaek, N. E., & Juul, A. (2009). Recent decline in age at breast development: the Copenhagen Puberty Study. Pediatrics, 123(5), e932-9. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-2491
Aksglaede L, et al. Recent Decline in Age at Breast Development: the Copenhagen Puberty Study. Pediatrics. 2009;123(5):e932-9. PubMed PMID: 19403485.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recent decline in age at breast development: the Copenhagen Puberty Study. AU - Aksglaede,Lise, AU - Sørensen,Kaspar, AU - Petersen,Jørgen H, AU - Skakkebaek,Niels E, AU - Juul,Anders, PY - 2009/5/1/entrez PY - 2009/5/1/pubmed PY - 2009/5/27/medline SP - e932 EP - 9 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 123 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Recent publications showing unexpectedly early breast development in American girls created debate worldwide. However, secular trend analyses are often limited by poor data comparability among studies performed by different researchers in different time periods and populations. Here we present new European data systematically collected from the same region and by 1 research group at the beginning and end of the recent 15-year period. METHODS: Girls (N = 2095) aged 5.6 to 20.0 years were studied in 1991-1993 (1991 cohort; n = 1100) and 2006-2008 (2006 cohort; n = 995). All girls were evaluated by palpation of glandular breast, measurement of height and weight, and blood sampling (for estradiol, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone). Age distribution at entering pubertal breast stages 2 through 5, pubic hair stages 2 through 5, and menarche was estimated for the 2 cohorts. RESULTS: Onset of puberty, defined as mean estimated age at attainment of glandular breast tissue (Tanner breast stage 2+), occurred significantly earlier in the 2006 cohort (estimated mean age: 9.86 years) when compared with the 1991 cohort (estimated mean age: 10.88 years). The difference remained significant after adjustment for BMI. Estimated ages at menarche were 13.42 and 13.13 years in the 1991 and 2006 cohorts, respectively. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone did not differ between the 2 cohorts at any age interval, whereas significantly lower estradiol levels were found in 8- to 10-year-old girls from the 2006 cohort compared with similarly aged girls from the 1991 cohort. CONCLUSIONS: We found significantly earlier breast development among girls born more recently. Alterations in reproductive hormones and BMI did not explain these marked changes, which suggests that other factors yet to be identified may be involved. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19403485/Recent_decline_in_age_at_breast_development:_the_Copenhagen_Puberty_Study_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19403485 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -