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Adolescent and adult soy food intake and breast cancer risk: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study.
Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89(6):1920-6AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Soy food is a rich source of isoflavones--a class of phytoestrogens that has both antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to evaluate the association of adolescent and adult soy food intake with breast cancer risk in a cohort of 73,223 Chinese women who participated in the Shanghai Women's Health Study.

DESIGN

A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to assess usual dietary intake during adulthood and adolescence. After a mean follow-up of 7.4 y, 592 incident cases of breast cancer were identified for longitudinal analyses by using Cox regressions.

RESULTS

Adult soy food consumption, measured either by soy protein or isoflavone intake, was inversely associated with the risk of premenopausal breast cancer, and the association was highly statistically significant (P for trend < 0.001). The multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for the upper intake quintile compared with the lowest quintile were 0.41 (95% CI: 0.25, 0.70) for soy protein intake and 0.44 (95% CI: 0.26, 0.73) for isoflavone intake. High intake of soy foods during adolescence was also associated with a reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.97). Women who consumed a high amount of soy foods consistently during adolescence and adulthood had a substantially reduced risk of breast cancer. No significant association with soy food consumption was found for postmenopausal breast cancer.

CONCLUSION

This large, population-based, prospective cohort study provides strong evidence of a protective effect of soy food intake against premenopausal breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37203-1738, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19403632

Citation

Lee, Sang-Ah, et al. "Adolescent and Adult Soy Food Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: Results From the Shanghai Women's Health Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 89, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1920-6.
Lee SA, Shu XO, Li H, et al. Adolescent and adult soy food intake and breast cancer risk: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(6):1920-6.
Lee, S. A., Shu, X. O., Li, H., Yang, G., Cai, H., Wen, W., ... Zheng, W. (2009). Adolescent and adult soy food intake and breast cancer risk: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 89(6), pp. 1920-6. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2008.27361.
Lee SA, et al. Adolescent and Adult Soy Food Intake and Breast Cancer Risk: Results From the Shanghai Women's Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(6):1920-6. PubMed PMID: 19403632.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent and adult soy food intake and breast cancer risk: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study. AU - Lee,Sang-Ah, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, AU - Li,Honglan, AU - Yang,Gong, AU - Cai,Hui, AU - Wen,Wanqing, AU - Ji,Bu-Tian, AU - Gao,Jing, AU - Gao,Yu-Tang, AU - Zheng,Wei, Y1 - 2009/04/29/ PY - 2009/5/1/entrez PY - 2009/5/1/pubmed PY - 2009/6/13/medline SP - 1920 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 89 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Soy food is a rich source of isoflavones--a class of phytoestrogens that has both antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the association of adolescent and adult soy food intake with breast cancer risk in a cohort of 73,223 Chinese women who participated in the Shanghai Women's Health Study. DESIGN: A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to assess usual dietary intake during adulthood and adolescence. After a mean follow-up of 7.4 y, 592 incident cases of breast cancer were identified for longitudinal analyses by using Cox regressions. RESULTS: Adult soy food consumption, measured either by soy protein or isoflavone intake, was inversely associated with the risk of premenopausal breast cancer, and the association was highly statistically significant (P for trend < 0.001). The multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for the upper intake quintile compared with the lowest quintile were 0.41 (95% CI: 0.25, 0.70) for soy protein intake and 0.44 (95% CI: 0.26, 0.73) for isoflavone intake. High intake of soy foods during adolescence was also associated with a reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.97). Women who consumed a high amount of soy foods consistently during adolescence and adulthood had a substantially reduced risk of breast cancer. No significant association with soy food consumption was found for postmenopausal breast cancer. CONCLUSION: This large, population-based, prospective cohort study provides strong evidence of a protective effect of soy food intake against premenopausal breast cancer. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19403632/Adolescent_and_adult_soy_food_intake_and_breast_cancer_risk:_results_from_the_Shanghai_Women's_Health_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2008.27361 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -