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Cost and utilization of COPD and asthma among insured adults in the US.
Curr Med Res Opin. 2009 Jun; 25(6):1385-92.CM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study evaluates the burden of concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) + asthma, two highly prevalent and costly conditions.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

The authors identified commercial enrollees from a large health plan database who were aged > or =40 years with medical and pharmacy benefits and medical claims with diagnosis codes for COPD or asthma between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. We assigned patients to COPD or COPD + asthma cohorts, excluding all others. A patient index date was the first evidence date of COPD or COPD + asthma. We excluded those with one outpatient COPD or asthma claim or who were not continuously enrolled during the 12 months before and after index date. After controlling for differences, postindex respiratory-related emergency department (ED) visits and/or hospitalizations and costs were compared between cohorts.

RESULTS

We identified 24,935 patients, 17,394 (70%) in the COPD cohort and 7,541 (30%) in the COPD + asthma cohort. COPD + asthma patients were younger (58 versus 60 years; p < 0.0001) and more were females (62% vs 45%; p < 0.0001). COPD + asthma patients were 1.6 times more likely to have respiratory-related EDs and/or hospitalizations than COPD patients (95% CI 1.5, 1.8), and had $1987 (SE = $174, p < 0.0001) more respiratory-related healthcare costs. Mean adjusted respiratory-related healthcare costs were $3803 for COPD and $5790 for COPD + asthma. Limitations include a potential for misclassification due to misdiagnosis or coding errors as well as traditional biases of observational studies including the potential for omitted variable bias.

CONCLUSION

COPD + asthma patients are more costly and use more services than those with COPD, and may be more unstable and require more intensive treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA. cblanchette@lrrri.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19419342

Citation

Blanchette, Christopher M., et al. "Cost and Utilization of COPD and Asthma Among Insured Adults in the US." Current Medical Research and Opinion, vol. 25, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1385-92.
Blanchette CM, Broder M, Ory C, et al. Cost and utilization of COPD and asthma among insured adults in the US. Curr Med Res Opin. 2009;25(6):1385-92.
Blanchette, C. M., Broder, M., Ory, C., Chang, E., Akazawa, M., & Dalal, A. A. (2009). Cost and utilization of COPD and asthma among insured adults in the US. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 25(6), 1385-92. https://doi.org/10.1185/03007990902875927
Blanchette CM, et al. Cost and Utilization of COPD and Asthma Among Insured Adults in the US. Curr Med Res Opin. 2009;25(6):1385-92. PubMed PMID: 19419342.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cost and utilization of COPD and asthma among insured adults in the US. AU - Blanchette,Christopher M, AU - Broder,Michael, AU - Ory,Caron, AU - Chang,Eunice, AU - Akazawa,Manabu, AU - Dalal,Anand A, PY - 2009/5/8/entrez PY - 2009/5/8/pubmed PY - 2010/6/12/medline SP - 1385 EP - 92 JF - Current medical research and opinion JO - Curr Med Res Opin VL - 25 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study evaluates the burden of concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) + asthma, two highly prevalent and costly conditions. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The authors identified commercial enrollees from a large health plan database who were aged > or =40 years with medical and pharmacy benefits and medical claims with diagnosis codes for COPD or asthma between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. We assigned patients to COPD or COPD + asthma cohorts, excluding all others. A patient index date was the first evidence date of COPD or COPD + asthma. We excluded those with one outpatient COPD or asthma claim or who were not continuously enrolled during the 12 months before and after index date. After controlling for differences, postindex respiratory-related emergency department (ED) visits and/or hospitalizations and costs were compared between cohorts. RESULTS: We identified 24,935 patients, 17,394 (70%) in the COPD cohort and 7,541 (30%) in the COPD + asthma cohort. COPD + asthma patients were younger (58 versus 60 years; p < 0.0001) and more were females (62% vs 45%; p < 0.0001). COPD + asthma patients were 1.6 times more likely to have respiratory-related EDs and/or hospitalizations than COPD patients (95% CI 1.5, 1.8), and had $1987 (SE = $174, p < 0.0001) more respiratory-related healthcare costs. Mean adjusted respiratory-related healthcare costs were $3803 for COPD and $5790 for COPD + asthma. Limitations include a potential for misclassification due to misdiagnosis or coding errors as well as traditional biases of observational studies including the potential for omitted variable bias. CONCLUSION: COPD + asthma patients are more costly and use more services than those with COPD, and may be more unstable and require more intensive treatment. SN - 1473-4877 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19419342/Cost_and_utilization_of_COPD_and_asthma_among_insured_adults_in_the_US_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1185/03007990902875927 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -