Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Serum folate and cancer mortality among U.S. adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey linked mortality file.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 May; 18(5):1439-47.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relation between folate status and cancer is controversial. Several epidemiologic studies have suggested that increased folate intake is associated with reduced risk of various cancers, others have found no such associations, and a few have suggested that high folate intake might increase the risk of certain cancers.

METHODS

Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) Mortality File, a prospective cohort study of a nationally representative sample of 14,611 U.S. adults, we conducted Cox proportional hazards regression modeling to investigate the association of baseline serum folate concentrations and all-cancer mortality determined from linked death certificate data.

RESULTS

Relative to the lowest quintile of serum folate (<3.0 ng/mL), the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios across quintiles 2 to 5 were: 1.61 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.11-2.32], 1.00 (95% CI, 0.65-1.49), 1.39 (95% CI, 0.96-2.03), and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.59-1.22). These findings did not differ substantially by age or sex, but the higher risk for those in the second quintile appeared limited to non-Hispanic whites.

CONCLUSION

These findings suggest that there may be a nonlinear relationship between folate status and the risk of all-cancer mortality such that persons with low, but not grossly deficient, serum blood folate concentrations may be at increased risk. Further study is needed to determine whether these findings are due to chance, and if not, to clarify their biological basis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. qay0@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19423522

Citation

Yang, Quanhe, et al. "Serum Folate and Cancer Mortality Among U.S. Adults: Findings From the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey Linked Mortality File." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 18, no. 5, 2009, pp. 1439-47.
Yang Q, Bostick RM, Friedman JM, et al. Serum folate and cancer mortality among U.S. adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey linked mortality file. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009;18(5):1439-47.
Yang, Q., Bostick, R. M., Friedman, J. M., & Flanders, W. D. (2009). Serum folate and cancer mortality among U.S. adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey linked mortality file. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 18(5), 1439-47. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0908
Yang Q, et al. Serum Folate and Cancer Mortality Among U.S. Adults: Findings From the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey Linked Mortality File. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009;18(5):1439-47. PubMed PMID: 19423522.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum folate and cancer mortality among U.S. adults: findings from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey linked mortality file. AU - Yang,Quanhe, AU - Bostick,Roberd M, AU - Friedman,J M, AU - Flanders,W Dana, PY - 2009/5/9/entrez PY - 2009/5/9/pubmed PY - 2009/6/26/medline SP - 1439 EP - 47 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relation between folate status and cancer is controversial. Several epidemiologic studies have suggested that increased folate intake is associated with reduced risk of various cancers, others have found no such associations, and a few have suggested that high folate intake might increase the risk of certain cancers. METHODS: Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) Mortality File, a prospective cohort study of a nationally representative sample of 14,611 U.S. adults, we conducted Cox proportional hazards regression modeling to investigate the association of baseline serum folate concentrations and all-cancer mortality determined from linked death certificate data. RESULTS: Relative to the lowest quintile of serum folate (<3.0 ng/mL), the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios across quintiles 2 to 5 were: 1.61 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.11-2.32], 1.00 (95% CI, 0.65-1.49), 1.39 (95% CI, 0.96-2.03), and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.59-1.22). These findings did not differ substantially by age or sex, but the higher risk for those in the second quintile appeared limited to non-Hispanic whites. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that there may be a nonlinear relationship between folate status and the risk of all-cancer mortality such that persons with low, but not grossly deficient, serum blood folate concentrations may be at increased risk. Further study is needed to determine whether these findings are due to chance, and if not, to clarify their biological basis. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19423522/Serum_folate_and_cancer_mortality_among_U_S__adults:_findings_from_the_Third_National_Health_and_Nutritional_Examination_Survey_linked_mortality_file_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -