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Military deployment: the impact on children and family adjustment and the need for care.
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2009 Jul; 22(4):369-73.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Over a million children and their families have now experienced the stress of the deployment of a family member during the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Whereas there is an extensive clinical literature about the developmental challenges facing children and issues of family adjustment, there is a lack of systematic research. This review summarizes the findings of recent publications.

RECENT FINDINGS

Some veterans develop posttraumatic stress disorder as a consequence of their experiences. This condition drives many of the adverse changes in the families of returning veterans through the effects on intimacy and nurturance in their families of withdrawal, numbing and irritability that are components of posttraumatic stress disorder. There is the more general challenge that all families and children face when a partner/parent deploys of role ambiguity consequent on anxiety that is provoked by the threat that deployed family members experience. A study of Kuwaiti military showed that mothers' anxiety had the greatest impact on the children of deployed fathers, although absence of posttraumatic stress disorder in mothers could mitigate the effects of their fathers' posttraumatic stress disorder. Intervention programs are described, but there is a poverty of their evaluation.

SUMMARY

A substantial advantage of focusing on family adjustment is that it can facilitate access to mental healthcare for veterans while assisting families' positive adaptation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Adelaide, The Centre for Military and Veterans' Health, Adelaide, South Australia. alexander.mcfarlane@adelaide.edu.au

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19424067

Citation

McFarlane, Alexander C.. "Military Deployment: the Impact On Children and Family Adjustment and the Need for Care." Current Opinion in Psychiatry, vol. 22, no. 4, 2009, pp. 369-73.
McFarlane AC. Military deployment: the impact on children and family adjustment and the need for care. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2009;22(4):369-73.
McFarlane, A. C. (2009). Military deployment: the impact on children and family adjustment and the need for care. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 22(4), 369-73. https://doi.org/10.1097/YCO.0b013e32832c9064
McFarlane AC. Military Deployment: the Impact On Children and Family Adjustment and the Need for Care. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2009;22(4):369-73. PubMed PMID: 19424067.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Military deployment: the impact on children and family adjustment and the need for care. A1 - McFarlane,Alexander C, PY - 2009/5/9/entrez PY - 2009/5/9/pubmed PY - 2009/8/29/medline SP - 369 EP - 73 JF - Current opinion in psychiatry JO - Curr Opin Psychiatry VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Over a million children and their families have now experienced the stress of the deployment of a family member during the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Whereas there is an extensive clinical literature about the developmental challenges facing children and issues of family adjustment, there is a lack of systematic research. This review summarizes the findings of recent publications. RECENT FINDINGS: Some veterans develop posttraumatic stress disorder as a consequence of their experiences. This condition drives many of the adverse changes in the families of returning veterans through the effects on intimacy and nurturance in their families of withdrawal, numbing and irritability that are components of posttraumatic stress disorder. There is the more general challenge that all families and children face when a partner/parent deploys of role ambiguity consequent on anxiety that is provoked by the threat that deployed family members experience. A study of Kuwaiti military showed that mothers' anxiety had the greatest impact on the children of deployed fathers, although absence of posttraumatic stress disorder in mothers could mitigate the effects of their fathers' posttraumatic stress disorder. Intervention programs are described, but there is a poverty of their evaluation. SUMMARY: A substantial advantage of focusing on family adjustment is that it can facilitate access to mental healthcare for veterans while assisting families' positive adaptation. SN - 1473-6578 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19424067/Military_deployment:_the_impact_on_children_and_family_adjustment_and_the_need_for_care_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/YCO.0b013e32832c9064 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -