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Serious psychological distress and its associations with body mass index: findings from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
Int J Public Health. 2009 Jun; 54 Suppl 1:30-6.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the associations of body mass index (BMI) with serious psychological distress (SPD) after taking into consideration the obesity-related comorbidities (ORCs), lifestyle factors, or emotional support.

METHODS

Self-reported data (n = 153,865) from the 2007 BRFSS were analyzed. Psychological distress was assessed by the Kessler-6 Questionnaire; respondents with a Kessler-6 score of > or = 13 were defined as having SPD. The adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using log-binomial regression analyses.

RESULTS

Overall, 3.2 % of U.S. adults had SPD. The prevalence of SPD was significantly higher among men who were underweight or obese, or among women who were underweight, overweight or obese, compared to those with a normal BMI. The APRs for SPD were 1.58 (95 % CI: 1.06-2.35) in adults who were underweight, and were 1.21 (95 % CI: 1.04-1.41), 1.31 (95 % CI: 1.07-1.61), and 1.36 (95 % CI: 1.13-1.63), respectively, in obese adults with BMI of 30-<35 kg/m(2), 35-<40 kg/m(2), and > or =40 kg/m(2) (adults with a normal BMI as the referent).

CONCLUSION

An abnormal BMI is associated with an increased likelihood of having SPD independent of multiple ORCs, lifestyle factors, or emotional support.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway N.E., Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. GZhao@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19424662

Citation

Zhao, Guixiang, et al. "Serious Psychological Distress and Its Associations With Body Mass Index: Findings From the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System." International Journal of Public Health, vol. 54 Suppl 1, 2009, pp. 30-6.
Zhao G, Ford ES, Li C, et al. Serious psychological distress and its associations with body mass index: findings from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Int J Public Health. 2009;54 Suppl 1:30-6.
Zhao, G., Ford, E. S., Li, C., Strine, T. W., Dhingra, S., Berry, J. T., & Mokdad, A. H. (2009). Serious psychological distress and its associations with body mass index: findings from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. International Journal of Public Health, 54 Suppl 1, 30-6. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-009-0004-3
Zhao G, et al. Serious Psychological Distress and Its Associations With Body Mass Index: Findings From the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Int J Public Health. 2009;54 Suppl 1:30-6. PubMed PMID: 19424662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serious psychological distress and its associations with body mass index: findings from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. AU - Zhao,Guixiang, AU - Ford,Earl S, AU - Li,Chaoyang, AU - Strine,Tara W, AU - Dhingra,Satvinder, AU - Berry,Joyce T, AU - Mokdad,Ali H, PY - 2009/5/9/entrez PY - 2009/5/9/pubmed PY - 2009/11/13/medline SP - 30 EP - 6 JF - International journal of public health JO - Int J Public Health VL - 54 Suppl 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of body mass index (BMI) with serious psychological distress (SPD) after taking into consideration the obesity-related comorbidities (ORCs), lifestyle factors, or emotional support. METHODS: Self-reported data (n = 153,865) from the 2007 BRFSS were analyzed. Psychological distress was assessed by the Kessler-6 Questionnaire; respondents with a Kessler-6 score of > or = 13 were defined as having SPD. The adjusted prevalence ratios (APRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using log-binomial regression analyses. RESULTS: Overall, 3.2 % of U.S. adults had SPD. The prevalence of SPD was significantly higher among men who were underweight or obese, or among women who were underweight, overweight or obese, compared to those with a normal BMI. The APRs for SPD were 1.58 (95 % CI: 1.06-2.35) in adults who were underweight, and were 1.21 (95 % CI: 1.04-1.41), 1.31 (95 % CI: 1.07-1.61), and 1.36 (95 % CI: 1.13-1.63), respectively, in obese adults with BMI of 30-<35 kg/m(2), 35-<40 kg/m(2), and > or =40 kg/m(2) (adults with a normal BMI as the referent). CONCLUSION: An abnormal BMI is associated with an increased likelihood of having SPD independent of multiple ORCs, lifestyle factors, or emotional support. SN - 1661-8564 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19424662/Serious_psychological_distress_and_its_associations_with_body_mass_index:_findings_from_the_2007_Behavioral_Risk_Factor_Surveillance_System_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00038-009-0004-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -