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EBV in MS: guilty by association?
Trends Immunol 2009; 30(6):243-8TI

Abstract

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is one of the most successful human viruses, infecting more than 90% of the adult population worldwide and persisting for the lifetime of the host. Individuals with a history of symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis, carry a moderately higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, EBV-specific immune responses, which crucially regulate the host-virus balance in healthy virus carriers, are altered in patients with MS. Although no data so far unequivocally support a direct etiologic role of the virus, recent studies allow for the development of testable hypotheses as to how EBV infection potentially promotes autoimmunity and central nervous system (CNS) tissue damage in MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Experimental Immunology, University Hospital Zürich, Switzerland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19428300

Citation

Lünemann, Jan D., and Christian Münz. "EBV in MS: Guilty By Association?" Trends in Immunology, vol. 30, no. 6, 2009, pp. 243-8.
Lünemann JD, Münz C. EBV in MS: guilty by association? Trends Immunol. 2009;30(6):243-8.
Lünemann, J. D., & Münz, C. (2009). EBV in MS: guilty by association? Trends in Immunology, 30(6), pp. 243-8. doi:10.1016/j.it.2009.03.007.
Lünemann JD, Münz C. EBV in MS: Guilty By Association. Trends Immunol. 2009;30(6):243-8. PubMed PMID: 19428300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - EBV in MS: guilty by association? AU - Lünemann,Jan D, AU - Münz,Christian, Y1 - 2009/05/08/ PY - 2009/03/02/received PY - 2009/03/25/revised PY - 2009/03/27/accepted PY - 2009/5/12/entrez PY - 2009/5/12/pubmed PY - 2009/9/18/medline SP - 243 EP - 8 JF - Trends in immunology JO - Trends Immunol. VL - 30 IS - 6 N2 - Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is one of the most successful human viruses, infecting more than 90% of the adult population worldwide and persisting for the lifetime of the host. Individuals with a history of symptomatic primary EBV infection, called infectious mononucleosis, carry a moderately higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, EBV-specific immune responses, which crucially regulate the host-virus balance in healthy virus carriers, are altered in patients with MS. Although no data so far unequivocally support a direct etiologic role of the virus, recent studies allow for the development of testable hypotheses as to how EBV infection potentially promotes autoimmunity and central nervous system (CNS) tissue damage in MS. SN - 1471-4981 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19428300/EBV_in_MS:_guilty_by_association L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1471-4906(09)00079-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -