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Antinociceptive activity of Amaranthus spinosus in experimental animals.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Apr 21; 122(3):492-6.JE

Abstract

AIM OF THE STUDY

50% ethanol extract (ASE) of Amaranthus spinosus (whole plant) has been evaluated for antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Analgesic and antiinflammatory activities were studied by measuring nociception by formalin, acetic acid, hot plate, tail immersion method while inflammation was induced by carrageenan.

RESULTS

ASE had significant dose dependent percentage protection against acetic acid (0.6% of 10 ml) induced pain and the effects were also compared to aspirin, morphine and naloxone while formalin induced pain (0.05 ml of 2.5%) was significantly blocked only at higher dose (400mg/kg) in first phase. ASE significantly blocked pain emanating from inflammation at all the doses in second phase. The reaction time in hot plate was increased significantly and dose dependently where as pretreatment with naloxone rigorously reduced the analgesic potentials of ASE. Further in tail immersion test the same dose dependent and significant activity was observed. Aspirin had no effect on thermal induced pain i.e. hot plate and tail immersion tests but showed an effect on writhing test.

CONCLUSIONS

Our investigation show that Amaranthus spinosus possess significant and dose dependant antiinflammatory activity, it has also central and peripheral analgesic activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pharmacognosy and Ethnopharmacology Division, National Botanical Research Institute Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19429318

Citation

Zeashan, Hussain, et al. "Antinociceptive Activity of Amaranthus Spinosus in Experimental Animals." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 122, no. 3, 2009, pp. 492-6.
Zeashan H, Amresh G, Rao CV, et al. Antinociceptive activity of Amaranthus spinosus in experimental animals. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009;122(3):492-6.
Zeashan, H., Amresh, G., Rao, C. V., & Singh, S. (2009). Antinociceptive activity of Amaranthus spinosus in experimental animals. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 122(3), 492-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2009.01.031
Zeashan H, et al. Antinociceptive Activity of Amaranthus Spinosus in Experimental Animals. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Apr 21;122(3):492-6. PubMed PMID: 19429318.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antinociceptive activity of Amaranthus spinosus in experimental animals. AU - Zeashan,Hussain, AU - Amresh,G, AU - Rao,Chandana Venkateswara, AU - Singh,Satyawan, Y1 - 2009/01/31/ PY - 2007/08/08/received PY - 2008/11/18/revised PY - 2009/01/20/accepted PY - 2009/5/12/entrez PY - 2009/5/12/pubmed PY - 2009/8/6/medline SP - 492 EP - 6 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 122 IS - 3 N2 - AIM OF THE STUDY: 50% ethanol extract (ASE) of Amaranthus spinosus (whole plant) has been evaluated for antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analgesic and antiinflammatory activities were studied by measuring nociception by formalin, acetic acid, hot plate, tail immersion method while inflammation was induced by carrageenan. RESULTS: ASE had significant dose dependent percentage protection against acetic acid (0.6% of 10 ml) induced pain and the effects were also compared to aspirin, morphine and naloxone while formalin induced pain (0.05 ml of 2.5%) was significantly blocked only at higher dose (400mg/kg) in first phase. ASE significantly blocked pain emanating from inflammation at all the doses in second phase. The reaction time in hot plate was increased significantly and dose dependently where as pretreatment with naloxone rigorously reduced the analgesic potentials of ASE. Further in tail immersion test the same dose dependent and significant activity was observed. Aspirin had no effect on thermal induced pain i.e. hot plate and tail immersion tests but showed an effect on writhing test. CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation show that Amaranthus spinosus possess significant and dose dependant antiinflammatory activity, it has also central and peripheral analgesic activity. SN - 1872-7573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19429318/Antinociceptive_activity_of_Amaranthus_spinosus_in_experimental_animals_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(09)00048-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -