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Teaching dairy production medicine to entry-level veterinarians: the summer dairy institute model.
J Vet Med Educ. 2009 Spring; 36(1):16-21.JV

Abstract

Food supply veterinarians who intend to enter dairy cattle practice or other related career activities are in need of up-graded skills to better serve the dairy industry as it continues to evolve. The time available for students to increase their abilities within the conventional professional curriculum is scarce, especially as those with food-supply interests are a minority of students competing for time and resources. The dairy industry has need of skilled veterinarians who are not only well versed in their traditional capabilities, but who also have an understanding of the complete picture of that industry as a "farm-to-fork" experience. Society at large also stands to benefit from the presence of skilled dairy veterinarians contributing to the production of safe, affordable dairy foodstuffs in a manner deemed sustainable and humane. Veterinarians in practice can and do acquire the necessary skills to make themselves relevant to their clients and consumers; however, better preparation of entry-level veterinarians could increase their value to their employers, clients, themselves, and society in a more timely manner. Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine developed the Summer Dairy Institute to provide an avenue for advancing the skills of new veterinarians as a means to address the current and future needs of the dairy industry. This article describes the need for, concept of, and experience with that program.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Summer Dairy Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19435986

Citation

Nydam, Charles W., et al. "Teaching Dairy Production Medicine to Entry-level Veterinarians: the Summer Dairy Institute Model." Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, vol. 36, no. 1, 2009, pp. 16-21.
Nydam CW, Nydam DV, Guard CL, et al. Teaching dairy production medicine to entry-level veterinarians: the summer dairy institute model. J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36(1):16-21.
Nydam, C. W., Nydam, D. V., Guard, C. L., & Gilbert, R. O. (2009). Teaching dairy production medicine to entry-level veterinarians: the summer dairy institute model. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 36(1), 16-21. https://doi.org/10.3138/jvme.36.1.16
Nydam CW, et al. Teaching Dairy Production Medicine to Entry-level Veterinarians: the Summer Dairy Institute Model. J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36(1):16-21. PubMed PMID: 19435986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Teaching dairy production medicine to entry-level veterinarians: the summer dairy institute model. AU - Nydam,Charles W, AU - Nydam,Daryl V, AU - Guard,Charles L, AU - Gilbert,Robert O, PY - 2009/5/14/entrez PY - 2009/5/14/pubmed PY - 2009/7/10/medline SP - 16 EP - 21 JF - Journal of veterinary medical education JO - J Vet Med Educ VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - Food supply veterinarians who intend to enter dairy cattle practice or other related career activities are in need of up-graded skills to better serve the dairy industry as it continues to evolve. The time available for students to increase their abilities within the conventional professional curriculum is scarce, especially as those with food-supply interests are a minority of students competing for time and resources. The dairy industry has need of skilled veterinarians who are not only well versed in their traditional capabilities, but who also have an understanding of the complete picture of that industry as a "farm-to-fork" experience. Society at large also stands to benefit from the presence of skilled dairy veterinarians contributing to the production of safe, affordable dairy foodstuffs in a manner deemed sustainable and humane. Veterinarians in practice can and do acquire the necessary skills to make themselves relevant to their clients and consumers; however, better preparation of entry-level veterinarians could increase their value to their employers, clients, themselves, and society in a more timely manner. Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine developed the Summer Dairy Institute to provide an avenue for advancing the skills of new veterinarians as a means to address the current and future needs of the dairy industry. This article describes the need for, concept of, and experience with that program. SN - 0748-321X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19435986/Teaching_dairy_production_medicine_to_entry_level_veterinarians:_the_summer_dairy_institute_model_ L2 - https://jvme.utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/jvme.36.1.16?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -