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Livestock producers' views on accessing food-animal veterinary services: implications for student recruitment, training, and practice management.
J Vet Med Educ. 2009 Spring; 36(1):30-8.JV

Abstract

Nationally, shortages of food-animal veterinary practitioners have been projected over the next several years. The purpose of this study was to ascertain livestock producers' perceptions on access to veterinary services and to measure opinions on potential solutions to access problems. Data for the study were from a 2006 survey of livestock producers in Tennessee. The study found that the majority of livestock producers had not perceived problems in obtaining veterinary services during the past year. Among those who had, the problems most commonly cited were a delay in obtaining services; that the veterinarian would treat the animal only if the producer transported it to the veterinary facility; and that the cost of the veterinary service was too high relative to the value of the animal. While it was hypothesized that producers who experienced a problem would have smaller farms on average and would reside in counties with lower numbers of large- or food-animal veterinarians, the results did not support this hypothesis. Among those who perceived a problem, scholarship programs to encourage veterinary students to specialize in large- or food-animal care and greater availability of veterinary technicians to perform health care services were viewed as effective ways to alleviate access problems. Financial incentives for veterinarians to locate in rural areas were also viewed as effective. While shortages have been predicted nationally, data from this survey do not suggest a perceived shortage in Tennessee. Problems in obtaining services appear to be more closely related to practice management and availability of large-animal practitioners in dairy and equine medicine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Agricultural Economics, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4518, USA. kjensen@utk.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19435988

Citation

Jensen, Kimberly L., et al. "Livestock Producers' Views On Accessing Food-animal Veterinary Services: Implications for Student Recruitment, Training, and Practice Management." Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, vol. 36, no. 1, 2009, pp. 30-8.
Jensen KL, English BC, Menard RJ, et al. Livestock producers' views on accessing food-animal veterinary services: implications for student recruitment, training, and practice management. J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36(1):30-8.
Jensen, K. L., English, B. C., Menard, R. J., & Holland, R. E. (2009). Livestock producers' views on accessing food-animal veterinary services: implications for student recruitment, training, and practice management. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 36(1), 30-8. https://doi.org/10.3138/jvme.36.1.30
Jensen KL, et al. Livestock Producers' Views On Accessing Food-animal Veterinary Services: Implications for Student Recruitment, Training, and Practice Management. J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36(1):30-8. PubMed PMID: 19435988.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Livestock producers' views on accessing food-animal veterinary services: implications for student recruitment, training, and practice management. AU - Jensen,Kimberly L, AU - English,Burton C, AU - Menard,R Jamey, AU - Holland,Robert E, PY - 2009/5/14/entrez PY - 2009/5/14/pubmed PY - 2009/7/10/medline SP - 30 EP - 8 JF - Journal of veterinary medical education JO - J Vet Med Educ VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - Nationally, shortages of food-animal veterinary practitioners have been projected over the next several years. The purpose of this study was to ascertain livestock producers' perceptions on access to veterinary services and to measure opinions on potential solutions to access problems. Data for the study were from a 2006 survey of livestock producers in Tennessee. The study found that the majority of livestock producers had not perceived problems in obtaining veterinary services during the past year. Among those who had, the problems most commonly cited were a delay in obtaining services; that the veterinarian would treat the animal only if the producer transported it to the veterinary facility; and that the cost of the veterinary service was too high relative to the value of the animal. While it was hypothesized that producers who experienced a problem would have smaller farms on average and would reside in counties with lower numbers of large- or food-animal veterinarians, the results did not support this hypothesis. Among those who perceived a problem, scholarship programs to encourage veterinary students to specialize in large- or food-animal care and greater availability of veterinary technicians to perform health care services were viewed as effective ways to alleviate access problems. Financial incentives for veterinarians to locate in rural areas were also viewed as effective. While shortages have been predicted nationally, data from this survey do not suggest a perceived shortage in Tennessee. Problems in obtaining services appear to be more closely related to practice management and availability of large-animal practitioners in dairy and equine medicine. SN - 0748-321X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19435988/Livestock_producers'_views_on_accessing_food_animal_veterinary_services:_implications_for_student_recruitment_training_and_practice_management_ L2 - https://jvme.utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/jvme.36.1.30?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -