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Emergency department patient flow: the influence of hospital census variables on emergency department length of stay.
Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Jul; 16(7):597-602.AE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The objective was to evaluate the association between hospital census variables and emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS). This may give insights into future strategies to relieve ED crowding.

METHODS

This multicenter cohort study captured ED LOS and disposition for all ED patients in five hospitals during five 1-week study periods. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to examine associations between ED LOS and various hospital census parameters.

RESULTS

Data were analyzed on 27,325 patients on 161 study days. A significant positive relationship was demonstrated between median ED LOS and intensive care unit (ICU) census, cardiac telemetry census, and the percentage of ED patients admitted each day. There was no relationship in this cohort between ED LOS and ED volume, total hospital occupancy rate, or the number of scheduled cardiac or surgical procedures.

CONCLUSIONS

In multiple hospital settings, ED LOS is correlated with the number of admissions and census of the higher acuity nursing units, more so than the number of ED patients each day, particularly in larger hospitals with busier EDs. Streamlining ED admissions and improving availability of inpatient critical care beds may reduce ED LOS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA. rlucas@mfa.gwu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19438415

Citation

Lucas, Ray, et al. "Emergency Department Patient Flow: the Influence of Hospital Census Variables On Emergency Department Length of Stay." Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 16, no. 7, 2009, pp. 597-602.
Lucas R, Farley H, Twanmoh J, et al. Emergency department patient flow: the influence of hospital census variables on emergency department length of stay. Acad Emerg Med. 2009;16(7):597-602.
Lucas, R., Farley, H., Twanmoh, J., Urumov, A., Olsen, N., Evans, B., & Kabiri, H. (2009). Emergency department patient flow: the influence of hospital census variables on emergency department length of stay. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 16(7), 597-602. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00397.x
Lucas R, et al. Emergency Department Patient Flow: the Influence of Hospital Census Variables On Emergency Department Length of Stay. Acad Emerg Med. 2009;16(7):597-602. PubMed PMID: 19438415.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emergency department patient flow: the influence of hospital census variables on emergency department length of stay. AU - Lucas,Ray, AU - Farley,Heather, AU - Twanmoh,Joseph, AU - Urumov,Andrej, AU - Olsen,Nils, AU - Evans,Bruce, AU - Kabiri,Hamed, PY - 2009/5/15/entrez PY - 2009/5/15/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 597 EP - 602 JF - Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine JO - Acad Emerg Med VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The objective was to evaluate the association between hospital census variables and emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS). This may give insights into future strategies to relieve ED crowding. METHODS: This multicenter cohort study captured ED LOS and disposition for all ED patients in five hospitals during five 1-week study periods. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to examine associations between ED LOS and various hospital census parameters. RESULTS: Data were analyzed on 27,325 patients on 161 study days. A significant positive relationship was demonstrated between median ED LOS and intensive care unit (ICU) census, cardiac telemetry census, and the percentage of ED patients admitted each day. There was no relationship in this cohort between ED LOS and ED volume, total hospital occupancy rate, or the number of scheduled cardiac or surgical procedures. CONCLUSIONS: In multiple hospital settings, ED LOS is correlated with the number of admissions and census of the higher acuity nursing units, more so than the number of ED patients each day, particularly in larger hospitals with busier EDs. Streamlining ED admissions and improving availability of inpatient critical care beds may reduce ED LOS. SN - 1553-2712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19438415/Emergency_department_patient_flow:_the_influence_of_hospital_census_variables_on_emergency_department_length_of_stay_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00397.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -