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Review article: diet and inflammatory bowel disease--epidemiology and treatment.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2009; 30(2):99-112AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diet is thought to have an important role in the immunopathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

AIM

To identify dietary constituents as risk factors for development of IBD and the therapeutic efficacy of dietary modifications or enteral nutrition in IBD.

METHODS

The Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched for clinical trials and meta-analyses in the scope of diet and nutrition in IBD.

RESULTS

There are many studies in small cohorts of patients that claim that intake of certain diet constituents like fat, refined sugar, fruits, vegetables and fibre affect the expression of IBD. These are often compromised by insufficient data or methodological limitations and do not provide unequivocal evidence to incriminate any particular dietary factor. Among various dietary interventions, none has shown striking efficacy with the possible exception of complete enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition appears effective in both active and quiescent Crohn's disease (CD), but independent meta-analyses have shown enteral nutrition to be inferior to corticosteroids in the management of active CD, when assessed on an intention-to-treat basis.

CONCLUSIONS

The current levels of knowledge concerning dietary risk factors for IBD, and the therapeutic efficacy of dietary and nutritional interventions need to be supported by well-designed trials in large cohorts of patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Centre, Yokkaichi Social Insurance Hospital, 10-8 Hazuyamacho, Yokkaichi, Mie 510-0016, Japan. nao-taka@sannet.ne.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19438426

Citation

Yamamoto, T, et al. "Review Article: Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease--epidemiology and Treatment." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 30, no. 2, 2009, pp. 99-112.
Yamamoto T, Nakahigashi M, Saniabadi AR. Review article: diet and inflammatory bowel disease--epidemiology and treatment. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009;30(2):99-112.
Yamamoto, T., Nakahigashi, M., & Saniabadi, A. R. (2009). Review article: diet and inflammatory bowel disease--epidemiology and treatment. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 30(2), pp. 99-112. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2009.04035.x.
Yamamoto T, Nakahigashi M, Saniabadi AR. Review Article: Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease--epidemiology and Treatment. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Jul 1;30(2):99-112. PubMed PMID: 19438426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review article: diet and inflammatory bowel disease--epidemiology and treatment. AU - Yamamoto,T, AU - Nakahigashi,M, AU - Saniabadi,A R, Y1 - 2009/05/06/ PY - 2009/5/15/entrez PY - 2009/5/15/pubmed PY - 2010/2/23/medline SP - 99 EP - 112 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diet is thought to have an important role in the immunopathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). AIM: To identify dietary constituents as risk factors for development of IBD and the therapeutic efficacy of dietary modifications or enteral nutrition in IBD. METHODS: The Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched for clinical trials and meta-analyses in the scope of diet and nutrition in IBD. RESULTS: There are many studies in small cohorts of patients that claim that intake of certain diet constituents like fat, refined sugar, fruits, vegetables and fibre affect the expression of IBD. These are often compromised by insufficient data or methodological limitations and do not provide unequivocal evidence to incriminate any particular dietary factor. Among various dietary interventions, none has shown striking efficacy with the possible exception of complete enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition appears effective in both active and quiescent Crohn's disease (CD), but independent meta-analyses have shown enteral nutrition to be inferior to corticosteroids in the management of active CD, when assessed on an intention-to-treat basis. CONCLUSIONS: The current levels of knowledge concerning dietary risk factors for IBD, and the therapeutic efficacy of dietary and nutritional interventions need to be supported by well-designed trials in large cohorts of patients. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19438426/Review_article:_diet_and_inflammatory_bowel_disease__epidemiology_and_treatment_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2009.04035.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -