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Dietary Echium oil increases tissue (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids without elevating hepatic lipid concentrations in premature neonatal rats.
J Nutr. 2009 Jul; 139(7):1353-9.JN

Abstract

Echium oil (EO) contains notable quantities of both (n-6) and (n-3) PUFA and has not, to our knowledge, been studied in neonates. We compared growth, tissue PUFA concentrations, and liver lipid profiles in premature neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats that were fed an EO diet with those that were dam-fed (DF) or fed rat milk substitute (RMS) or a fish oil (FO) diet. EO or FO comprised 10% of dietary fat. Rats were delivered prematurely at d 21 of gestation by caesarean section and then DF or fed one of the diets for 6 d. Rats were killed and the fatty acid (FA) concentrations in brain, liver, ileum, and serum and liver lipid profiles were analyzed. All diet-fed rats had similar weight gain and tissue protein concentrations. Compared with DF rats, EO-fed rats had similar brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels, similar brain and liver arachidonic acid (ARA) levels, higher liver and ileal eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels (P < 0.05), and similar ARA:(EPA+DHA) ratios in brain, liver, and serum. Compared with RMS-fed rats, EO-fed rats had lower liver triglyceride FA and cholesterol ester concentrations (P < 0.05), higher EPA and DHA levels in liver, ileum, and serum, a higher DHA level in brain, and lower tissue and serum ratios of total (n-6):(n-3) PUFA and ARA:(EPA + DHA) (P < 0.05). Compared with FO-fed rats, EO-fed rats had higher ARA levels in brain, liver, ileum, and serum. In conclusion, dietary EO increases tissue EPA and DHA without reducing ARA in brain and liver and without elevating hepatic lipid concentrations of premature neonatal rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Wake Forest University Health Science, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19439463

Citation

Yang, Qing, and T Michael O'Shea. "Dietary Echium Oil Increases Tissue (n-3) Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Without Elevating Hepatic Lipid Concentrations in Premature Neonatal Rats." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 139, no. 7, 2009, pp. 1353-9.
Yang Q, O'Shea TM. Dietary Echium oil increases tissue (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids without elevating hepatic lipid concentrations in premature neonatal rats. J Nutr. 2009;139(7):1353-9.
Yang, Q., & O'Shea, T. M. (2009). Dietary Echium oil increases tissue (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids without elevating hepatic lipid concentrations in premature neonatal rats. The Journal of Nutrition, 139(7), 1353-9. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.105221
Yang Q, O'Shea TM. Dietary Echium Oil Increases Tissue (n-3) Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Without Elevating Hepatic Lipid Concentrations in Premature Neonatal Rats. J Nutr. 2009;139(7):1353-9. PubMed PMID: 19439463.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Echium oil increases tissue (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids without elevating hepatic lipid concentrations in premature neonatal rats. AU - Yang,Qing, AU - O'Shea,T Michael, Y1 - 2009/05/13/ PY - 2009/5/15/entrez PY - 2009/5/15/pubmed PY - 2009/7/10/medline SP - 1353 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 139 IS - 7 N2 - Echium oil (EO) contains notable quantities of both (n-6) and (n-3) PUFA and has not, to our knowledge, been studied in neonates. We compared growth, tissue PUFA concentrations, and liver lipid profiles in premature neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats that were fed an EO diet with those that were dam-fed (DF) or fed rat milk substitute (RMS) or a fish oil (FO) diet. EO or FO comprised 10% of dietary fat. Rats were delivered prematurely at d 21 of gestation by caesarean section and then DF or fed one of the diets for 6 d. Rats were killed and the fatty acid (FA) concentrations in brain, liver, ileum, and serum and liver lipid profiles were analyzed. All diet-fed rats had similar weight gain and tissue protein concentrations. Compared with DF rats, EO-fed rats had similar brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels, similar brain and liver arachidonic acid (ARA) levels, higher liver and ileal eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels (P < 0.05), and similar ARA:(EPA+DHA) ratios in brain, liver, and serum. Compared with RMS-fed rats, EO-fed rats had lower liver triglyceride FA and cholesterol ester concentrations (P < 0.05), higher EPA and DHA levels in liver, ileum, and serum, a higher DHA level in brain, and lower tissue and serum ratios of total (n-6):(n-3) PUFA and ARA:(EPA + DHA) (P < 0.05). Compared with FO-fed rats, EO-fed rats had higher ARA levels in brain, liver, ileum, and serum. In conclusion, dietary EO increases tissue EPA and DHA without reducing ARA in brain and liver and without elevating hepatic lipid concentrations of premature neonatal rats. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19439463/Dietary_Echium_oil_increases_tissue__n_3__long_chain_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_without_elevating_hepatic_lipid_concentrations_in_premature_neonatal_rats_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.109.105221 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -