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Detection of hepatitis E virus in wild boars of rural and urban regions in Germany and whole genome characterization of an endemic strain.
Virol J. 2009 May 14; 6:58.VJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hepatitis E is an increasingly diagnosed human disease in Central Europe. Besides domestic pigs, in which hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is highly prevalent, wild boars have been identified as a possible source of human infection. In order to assess the distribution of HEV in the wild boar population of Germany, we tested liver samples originating from different geographical regions for the presence of the HEV genome and compared the detected sequences to animal and human HEV strains.

RESULTS

A total of 148 wild boar liver samples were tested using real-time RT-PCR resulting in an average HEV detection rate of 14.9% (95% CI 9.6-21.6). HEV was detected in all age classes and all geographical regions. However, the prevalence of HEV infection was significantly higher in rural as compared to urban regions (p < 0.001). Sequencing of the PCR products indicated a high degree of heterogenicity of the detected viruses within genotype 3 and a grouping according to their geographical origin. The whole genome sequence of an HEV isolate (wbGER27) detected in many wild boars in the federal state of Brandenburg was determined. It belongs to genotype 3i and shows 97.9% nucleotide sequence identity to a partial sequence derived from a human hepatitis E patient from Germany.

CONCLUSION

The results indicate that wild boars have to be considered as a reservoir for HEV in Germany and that a risk of HEV transmission to humans is present in rural as well as urban regions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Diedersdorfer Weg 1, 12277 Berlin, Germany. Anika.Schielke@bfr.bund.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19442307

Citation

Schielke, Anika, et al. "Detection of Hepatitis E Virus in Wild Boars of Rural and Urban Regions in Germany and Whole Genome Characterization of an Endemic Strain." Virology Journal, vol. 6, 2009, p. 58.
Schielke A, Sachs K, Lierz M, et al. Detection of hepatitis E virus in wild boars of rural and urban regions in Germany and whole genome characterization of an endemic strain. Virol J. 2009;6:58.
Schielke, A., Sachs, K., Lierz, M., Appel, B., Jansen, A., & Johne, R. (2009). Detection of hepatitis E virus in wild boars of rural and urban regions in Germany and whole genome characterization of an endemic strain. Virology Journal, 6, 58. https://doi.org/10.1186/1743-422X-6-58
Schielke A, et al. Detection of Hepatitis E Virus in Wild Boars of Rural and Urban Regions in Germany and Whole Genome Characterization of an Endemic Strain. Virol J. 2009 May 14;6:58. PubMed PMID: 19442307.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of hepatitis E virus in wild boars of rural and urban regions in Germany and whole genome characterization of an endemic strain. AU - Schielke,Anika, AU - Sachs,Katja, AU - Lierz,Michael, AU - Appel,Bernd, AU - Jansen,Andreas, AU - Johne,Reimar, Y1 - 2009/05/14/ PY - 2009/02/16/received PY - 2009/05/14/accepted PY - 2009/5/16/entrez PY - 2009/5/16/pubmed PY - 2009/7/11/medline SP - 58 EP - 58 JF - Virology journal JO - Virol J VL - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E is an increasingly diagnosed human disease in Central Europe. Besides domestic pigs, in which hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is highly prevalent, wild boars have been identified as a possible source of human infection. In order to assess the distribution of HEV in the wild boar population of Germany, we tested liver samples originating from different geographical regions for the presence of the HEV genome and compared the detected sequences to animal and human HEV strains. RESULTS: A total of 148 wild boar liver samples were tested using real-time RT-PCR resulting in an average HEV detection rate of 14.9% (95% CI 9.6-21.6). HEV was detected in all age classes and all geographical regions. However, the prevalence of HEV infection was significantly higher in rural as compared to urban regions (p < 0.001). Sequencing of the PCR products indicated a high degree of heterogenicity of the detected viruses within genotype 3 and a grouping according to their geographical origin. The whole genome sequence of an HEV isolate (wbGER27) detected in many wild boars in the federal state of Brandenburg was determined. It belongs to genotype 3i and shows 97.9% nucleotide sequence identity to a partial sequence derived from a human hepatitis E patient from Germany. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that wild boars have to be considered as a reservoir for HEV in Germany and that a risk of HEV transmission to humans is present in rural as well as urban regions. SN - 1743-422X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19442307/Detection_of_hepatitis_E_virus_in_wild_boars_of_rural_and_urban_regions_in_Germany_and_whole_genome_characterization_of_an_endemic_strain_ L2 - https://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-422X-6-58 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -