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Clinical implications of microsatellite instability in sporadic colon cancers.
Curr Opin Oncol 2009; 21(4):369-73CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

To review data demonstrating the prognostic and predictive impact of microsatellite instability (MSI) in human colon carcinomas.

RECENT FINDINGS

MSI is a molecular marker of defective DNA mismatch repair that is detected in approximately 15% of sporadic colon cancers. Most, but not all retrospective studies, have shown that colon cancers with MSI have better stage-adjusted survival rates compared with non-MSI tumors. Furthermore, analyses of colon cancers from participants in randomized adjuvant therapy trials have suggested that MSI tumors do not benefit from treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Recent studies, including a pooled analysis, validate prior data demonstrating the prognostic and predictive impact of MSI status in colon cancer.

SUMMARY

MSI is a molecular marker that can provide valuable prognostic and predictive information in colon cancer patients. In the appropriate clinical setting, MSI data can be used in clinical decision-making. Specifically, the favorable outcome of stage II colon cancers with MSI indicates that such patients should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Although data for stage III colon cancers with MSI suggest a lack of benefit from 5-fluorouracil alone, the benefit of the current standard treatment, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, in this subgroup remains unknown and awaits further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. sinicrope.frank@mayo.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19444104

Citation

Sinicrope, Frank A., and Daniel J. Sargent. "Clinical Implications of Microsatellite Instability in Sporadic Colon Cancers." Current Opinion in Oncology, vol. 21, no. 4, 2009, pp. 369-73.
Sinicrope FA, Sargent DJ. Clinical implications of microsatellite instability in sporadic colon cancers. Curr Opin Oncol. 2009;21(4):369-73.
Sinicrope, F. A., & Sargent, D. J. (2009). Clinical implications of microsatellite instability in sporadic colon cancers. Current Opinion in Oncology, 21(4), pp. 369-73. doi:10.1097/CCO.0b013e32832c94bd.
Sinicrope FA, Sargent DJ. Clinical Implications of Microsatellite Instability in Sporadic Colon Cancers. Curr Opin Oncol. 2009;21(4):369-73. PubMed PMID: 19444104.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical implications of microsatellite instability in sporadic colon cancers. AU - Sinicrope,Frank A, AU - Sargent,Daniel J, PY - 2009/5/16/entrez PY - 2009/5/16/pubmed PY - 2009/7/16/medline SP - 369 EP - 73 JF - Current opinion in oncology JO - Curr Opin Oncol VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review data demonstrating the prognostic and predictive impact of microsatellite instability (MSI) in human colon carcinomas. RECENT FINDINGS: MSI is a molecular marker of defective DNA mismatch repair that is detected in approximately 15% of sporadic colon cancers. Most, but not all retrospective studies, have shown that colon cancers with MSI have better stage-adjusted survival rates compared with non-MSI tumors. Furthermore, analyses of colon cancers from participants in randomized adjuvant therapy trials have suggested that MSI tumors do not benefit from treatment with 5-fluorouracil. Recent studies, including a pooled analysis, validate prior data demonstrating the prognostic and predictive impact of MSI status in colon cancer. SUMMARY: MSI is a molecular marker that can provide valuable prognostic and predictive information in colon cancer patients. In the appropriate clinical setting, MSI data can be used in clinical decision-making. Specifically, the favorable outcome of stage II colon cancers with MSI indicates that such patients should not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Although data for stage III colon cancers with MSI suggest a lack of benefit from 5-fluorouracil alone, the benefit of the current standard treatment, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, in this subgroup remains unknown and awaits further study. SN - 1531-703X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19444104/Clinical_implications_of_microsatellite_instability_in_sporadic_colon_cancers_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=19444104 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -