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The impact of obesity on overall and cancer specific survival in men with prostate cancer.
J Urol. 2009 Jul; 182(1):112-7; discussion 117.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

We examined the impact of obesity on disease specific and overall survival in patients with prostate cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We identified 7,274 men from the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urological Research Endeavor database with clinically localized prostate cancer, known body mass index and clinicopathological disease characteristics. Patients were classified by body mass index as normal (less than 25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25 to 29.9 kg/m(2)), obese (30 to 34.9 kg/m(2)) and severely obese (35 kg/m(2) or greater). Associations between body mass index and need for secondary treatment, disease specific survival and overall survival were analyzed using univariate and multivariate models.

RESULTS

Patients were classified by body mass index category as normal (28.8%), overweight (50%), obese (16.4%) and very obese (4.8%). Mean followup was 51.3 +/- 38.5 months. During followup there were 1,044 deaths with 220 (21.1%) from prostate cancer. Stratified by body mass index category the groups differed with regard to the need for secondary treatment (p = 0.05) and overall mortality (p <0.01) but there were no significant differences with regard to disease specific survival (p = 0.09). On multivariate analysis age 65 to 74 years (HR 2.4, p = 0.002), age older than 75 years (HR 3.2, p = 0.0001), high risk disease (HR 1.6, p <0.0001), conservative treatment (HR 1.2, p <0.0001) and presence of diabetes (HR 1.6, p <0.0001) were associated with decreased overall survival. Only conservative treatment (HR 1.4, p <0.0001), high risk disease (HR 8.4, p <0.0001) and intermediate risk disease (HR 2.5, p = 0.004) were associated with decreased disease specific survival.

CONCLUSIONS

In a prospective, community based cohort we were unable to establish a relationship between body mass index and prostate cancer disease specific survival or overall survival.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232, USA. daviesbj@upmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19447437

Citation

Davies, Benjamin J., et al. "The Impact of Obesity On Overall and Cancer Specific Survival in Men With Prostate Cancer." The Journal of Urology, vol. 182, no. 1, 2009, pp. 112-7; discussion 117.
Davies BJ, Smaldone MC, Sadetsky N, et al. The impact of obesity on overall and cancer specific survival in men with prostate cancer. J Urol. 2009;182(1):112-7; discussion 117.
Davies, B. J., Smaldone, M. C., Sadetsky, N., Dall'era, M., & Carroll, P. R. (2009). The impact of obesity on overall and cancer specific survival in men with prostate cancer. The Journal of Urology, 182(1), 112-7; discussion 117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2009.02.118
Davies BJ, et al. The Impact of Obesity On Overall and Cancer Specific Survival in Men With Prostate Cancer. J Urol. 2009;182(1):112-7; discussion 117. PubMed PMID: 19447437.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of obesity on overall and cancer specific survival in men with prostate cancer. AU - Davies,Benjamin J, AU - Smaldone,Marc C, AU - Sadetsky,Natalia, AU - Dall'era,Marc, AU - Carroll,Peter R, Y1 - 2009/05/17/ PY - 2008/10/27/received PY - 2009/5/19/entrez PY - 2009/5/19/pubmed PY - 2010/7/2/medline SP - 112-7; discussion 117 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 182 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: We examined the impact of obesity on disease specific and overall survival in patients with prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified 7,274 men from the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urological Research Endeavor database with clinically localized prostate cancer, known body mass index and clinicopathological disease characteristics. Patients were classified by body mass index as normal (less than 25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25 to 29.9 kg/m(2)), obese (30 to 34.9 kg/m(2)) and severely obese (35 kg/m(2) or greater). Associations between body mass index and need for secondary treatment, disease specific survival and overall survival were analyzed using univariate and multivariate models. RESULTS: Patients were classified by body mass index category as normal (28.8%), overweight (50%), obese (16.4%) and very obese (4.8%). Mean followup was 51.3 +/- 38.5 months. During followup there were 1,044 deaths with 220 (21.1%) from prostate cancer. Stratified by body mass index category the groups differed with regard to the need for secondary treatment (p = 0.05) and overall mortality (p <0.01) but there were no significant differences with regard to disease specific survival (p = 0.09). On multivariate analysis age 65 to 74 years (HR 2.4, p = 0.002), age older than 75 years (HR 3.2, p = 0.0001), high risk disease (HR 1.6, p <0.0001), conservative treatment (HR 1.2, p <0.0001) and presence of diabetes (HR 1.6, p <0.0001) were associated with decreased overall survival. Only conservative treatment (HR 1.4, p <0.0001), high risk disease (HR 8.4, p <0.0001) and intermediate risk disease (HR 2.5, p = 0.004) were associated with decreased disease specific survival. CONCLUSIONS: In a prospective, community based cohort we were unable to establish a relationship between body mass index and prostate cancer disease specific survival or overall survival. SN - 1527-3792 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19447437/The_impact_of_obesity_on_overall_and_cancer_specific_survival_in_men_with_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/10.1016/j.juro.2009.02.118?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -