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Predictive factors for acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder after motor vehicle accidents.
Psychopathology. 2009; 42(4):236-41.P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Since traffic accidents are more common in developing countries than in developed countries, we aimed to investigate the association of several factors with the development and persistence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after traffic accidents.

SAMPLING AND METHODS

In the study,95 participants with injuries from traffic accidents were evaluated at 4 different times: in the beginning, and after 3, 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS

During the first evaluation, 41.1% (39) of our participants had acute stress disorder (ASD). It was found that lower perceived social support (OR = 0.0908, 95% CI = 0.834-0.989, p = 0.027) and higher peritraumatic dissociative experience scores (OR = 1.332, 95% CI = 1.170-1.516, p < 0.001) were significant predictors of ASD. In the evaluations after 3, 6 and 12 months after the accident, we found PTSD affected 29.8, 23.1 and 17.9% of the participants, respectively. Although limitations at work and in social life after a traffic accident were not related to PTSD at 3 months (OR = 122.43, 95% CI = 0.000, p = 0.999) or at 6 months (OR = 63.438, 95% CI = 0.529-76.059, p = 0.089), limitations at work and in social life were predictors of PTSD at 12 months (OR = 155.514, 95% CI = 2.321-104.22, p = 0.019).

CONCLUSIONS

The persistence of PTSD at the 12-month evaluation is related to ASD, limitations in work and social life, and lower social support scores. In developing countries like Turkey, long-term PTSD is commonly seen after traffic accidents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey. ayasan@dicle.edu.trNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19451756

Citation

Yaşan, Aziz, et al. "Predictive Factors for Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After Motor Vehicle Accidents." Psychopathology, vol. 42, no. 4, 2009, pp. 236-41.
Yaşan A, Guzel A, Tamam Y, et al. Predictive factors for acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder after motor vehicle accidents. Psychopathology. 2009;42(4):236-41.
Yaşan, A., Guzel, A., Tamam, Y., & Ozkan, M. (2009). Predictive factors for acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder after motor vehicle accidents. Psychopathology, 42(4), 236-41. https://doi.org/10.1159/000218521
Yaşan A, et al. Predictive Factors for Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After Motor Vehicle Accidents. Psychopathology. 2009;42(4):236-41. PubMed PMID: 19451756.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictive factors for acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder after motor vehicle accidents. AU - Yaşan,Aziz, AU - Guzel,Aslan, AU - Tamam,Yusuf, AU - Ozkan,Mustafa, Y1 - 2009/05/16/ PY - 2009/5/20/entrez PY - 2009/5/20/pubmed PY - 2009/10/6/medline SP - 236 EP - 41 JF - Psychopathology JO - Psychopathology VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Since traffic accidents are more common in developing countries than in developed countries, we aimed to investigate the association of several factors with the development and persistence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after traffic accidents. SAMPLING AND METHODS: In the study,95 participants with injuries from traffic accidents were evaluated at 4 different times: in the beginning, and after 3, 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: During the first evaluation, 41.1% (39) of our participants had acute stress disorder (ASD). It was found that lower perceived social support (OR = 0.0908, 95% CI = 0.834-0.989, p = 0.027) and higher peritraumatic dissociative experience scores (OR = 1.332, 95% CI = 1.170-1.516, p < 0.001) were significant predictors of ASD. In the evaluations after 3, 6 and 12 months after the accident, we found PTSD affected 29.8, 23.1 and 17.9% of the participants, respectively. Although limitations at work and in social life after a traffic accident were not related to PTSD at 3 months (OR = 122.43, 95% CI = 0.000, p = 0.999) or at 6 months (OR = 63.438, 95% CI = 0.529-76.059, p = 0.089), limitations at work and in social life were predictors of PTSD at 12 months (OR = 155.514, 95% CI = 2.321-104.22, p = 0.019). CONCLUSIONS: The persistence of PTSD at the 12-month evaluation is related to ASD, limitations in work and social life, and lower social support scores. In developing countries like Turkey, long-term PTSD is commonly seen after traffic accidents. SN - 1423-033X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19451756/Predictive_factors_for_acute_stress_disorder_and_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_after_motor_vehicle_accidents_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000218521 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -