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Egg hypersensitivity and measles-mumps-rubella vaccine administration.
Pediatrics 1991; 88(5):913-7Ped

Abstract

Because reports have described egg-sensitive individuals in whom anaphylaxis developed after measles vaccination, current recommendations include delaying administration of egg-derived vaccines until skin testing can be performed. Specifically, the 1988 Red Book recommends skin testing via scratch, prick, or puncture with 1:10 dilution of the vaccine and, if the result is negative, intradermal testing is suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the likelihood of reaction to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in patients with documented egg sensitivity and to delineate the efficacy of skin-prick testing (SPT) to MMR as a predictor of hypersensitivity to the vaccine. Egg sensitivity was documented by initial SPT to egg and then, if possible, double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). Patients with a positive DBPCFC to egg or a history of anaphylactic egg sensitivity had a SPT with the MMR vaccine and then were given the MMR vaccine. Additionally, children with atopic dermatitis who had been previously proven egg sensitive via DBPCFCs were evaluated retrospectively for sensitivity to the MMR vaccine. Sixteen children with a history of egg sensitivity underwent SPT to egg, with a positive result 3 mm greater than the negative control found in 12 patients. Eight of these children had a positive DBPCFC to egg. The SPT to MMR vaccine was negative in all 16 children; vaccine administration followed with no resultant systemic problems. Three children had a local reaction at the site of injection. Twelve additional children with atopic dermatitis and egg sensitivity were reviewed. Each child had a positive SPT and DBPCFC to egg.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1945631

Citation

Beck, S A., et al. "Egg Hypersensitivity and Measles-mumps-rubella Vaccine Administration." Pediatrics, vol. 88, no. 5, 1991, pp. 913-7.
Beck SA, Williams LW, Shirrell MA, et al. Egg hypersensitivity and measles-mumps-rubella vaccine administration. Pediatrics. 1991;88(5):913-7.
Beck, S. A., Williams, L. W., Shirrell, M. A., & Burks, A. W. (1991). Egg hypersensitivity and measles-mumps-rubella vaccine administration. Pediatrics, 88(5), pp. 913-7.
Beck SA, et al. Egg Hypersensitivity and Measles-mumps-rubella Vaccine Administration. Pediatrics. 1991;88(5):913-7. PubMed PMID: 1945631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Egg hypersensitivity and measles-mumps-rubella vaccine administration. AU - Beck,S A, AU - Williams,L W, AU - Shirrell,M A, AU - Burks,A W, PY - 1991/11/1/pubmed PY - 1991/11/1/medline PY - 1991/11/1/entrez SP - 913 EP - 7 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 88 IS - 5 N2 - Because reports have described egg-sensitive individuals in whom anaphylaxis developed after measles vaccination, current recommendations include delaying administration of egg-derived vaccines until skin testing can be performed. Specifically, the 1988 Red Book recommends skin testing via scratch, prick, or puncture with 1:10 dilution of the vaccine and, if the result is negative, intradermal testing is suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the likelihood of reaction to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in patients with documented egg sensitivity and to delineate the efficacy of skin-prick testing (SPT) to MMR as a predictor of hypersensitivity to the vaccine. Egg sensitivity was documented by initial SPT to egg and then, if possible, double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). Patients with a positive DBPCFC to egg or a history of anaphylactic egg sensitivity had a SPT with the MMR vaccine and then were given the MMR vaccine. Additionally, children with atopic dermatitis who had been previously proven egg sensitive via DBPCFCs were evaluated retrospectively for sensitivity to the MMR vaccine. Sixteen children with a history of egg sensitivity underwent SPT to egg, with a positive result 3 mm greater than the negative control found in 12 patients. Eight of these children had a positive DBPCFC to egg. The SPT to MMR vaccine was negative in all 16 children; vaccine administration followed with no resultant systemic problems. Three children had a local reaction at the site of injection. Twelve additional children with atopic dermatitis and egg sensitivity were reviewed. Each child had a positive SPT and DBPCFC to egg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0031-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1945631/Egg_hypersensitivity_and_measles_mumps_rubella_vaccine_administration_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=1945631 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -