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Mimivirus and Mimiviridae: giant viruses with an increasing number of potential hosts, including corals and sponges.
J Invertebr Pathol. 2009 Jul; 101(3):172-80.JI

Abstract

Mimivirus, a giant DNA virus (i.e. "girus") infecting species of the genus Acanthamoeba, was first identified in 2003. With a particle size of 0.7microm in diameter, and a genome size of 1.2Mb encoding more than 900 proteins, it is the most complex virus described to date. Beyond its unusual size, the Mimivirus genome was found to contain the first viral homologues of many genes thought to be the trademark of cellular organisms, such as central components of the translation apparatus. These findings revived the debate on the origin of DNA viruses, and the role they might have played in the emergence of eukaryotes. Published and ongoing studies on Mimivirus continue to lead to unexpected findings concerning a variety of aspects, such as the structure of its particle, unique features of its replication cycle, or the distribution and abundance of Mimivirus relatives in the oceans. Following a summary of these recent findings, we present preliminary results suggesting that octocorals might have come in close contact with an ancestor of Mimivirus, and that modern sponges might be host to a yet unidentified, even larger, member of the Mimiviridae.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Structural and Genomic Information Laboratory, CNRS-UPR 2589, IFR-88, Parc Scientifique de Luminy, Case 934, Marseille, France. jean-michel.claverie@igs.cnrs-mrs.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19457438

Citation

Claverie, Jean-Michel, et al. "Mimivirus and Mimiviridae: Giant Viruses With an Increasing Number of Potential Hosts, Including Corals and Sponges." Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, vol. 101, no. 3, 2009, pp. 172-80.
Claverie JM, Grzela R, Lartigue A, et al. Mimivirus and Mimiviridae: giant viruses with an increasing number of potential hosts, including corals and sponges. J Invertebr Pathol. 2009;101(3):172-80.
Claverie, J. M., Grzela, R., Lartigue, A., Bernadac, A., Nitsche, S., Vacelet, J., Ogata, H., & Abergel, C. (2009). Mimivirus and Mimiviridae: giant viruses with an increasing number of potential hosts, including corals and sponges. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, 101(3), 172-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jip.2009.03.011
Claverie JM, et al. Mimivirus and Mimiviridae: Giant Viruses With an Increasing Number of Potential Hosts, Including Corals and Sponges. J Invertebr Pathol. 2009;101(3):172-80. PubMed PMID: 19457438.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mimivirus and Mimiviridae: giant viruses with an increasing number of potential hosts, including corals and sponges. AU - Claverie,Jean-Michel, AU - Grzela,Renata, AU - Lartigue,Audrey, AU - Bernadac,Alain, AU - Nitsche,Serge, AU - Vacelet,Jean, AU - Ogata,Hiroyuki, AU - Abergel,Chantal, Y1 - 2009/05/18/ PY - 2009/01/14/received PY - 2009/03/06/accepted PY - 2009/5/22/entrez PY - 2009/5/22/pubmed PY - 2009/11/5/medline SP - 172 EP - 80 JF - Journal of invertebrate pathology JO - J Invertebr Pathol VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - Mimivirus, a giant DNA virus (i.e. "girus") infecting species of the genus Acanthamoeba, was first identified in 2003. With a particle size of 0.7microm in diameter, and a genome size of 1.2Mb encoding more than 900 proteins, it is the most complex virus described to date. Beyond its unusual size, the Mimivirus genome was found to contain the first viral homologues of many genes thought to be the trademark of cellular organisms, such as central components of the translation apparatus. These findings revived the debate on the origin of DNA viruses, and the role they might have played in the emergence of eukaryotes. Published and ongoing studies on Mimivirus continue to lead to unexpected findings concerning a variety of aspects, such as the structure of its particle, unique features of its replication cycle, or the distribution and abundance of Mimivirus relatives in the oceans. Following a summary of these recent findings, we present preliminary results suggesting that octocorals might have come in close contact with an ancestor of Mimivirus, and that modern sponges might be host to a yet unidentified, even larger, member of the Mimiviridae. SN - 1096-0805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19457438/Mimivirus_and_Mimiviridae:_giant_viruses_with_an_increasing_number_of_potential_hosts_including_corals_and_sponges_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-2011(09)00086-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -