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Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status: the Viva la Familia Study.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jun; 109(6):1012-21.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The role of diet quality and nutrient adequacy in the etiology of childhood obesity is poorly understood. The specific aims of these analyses were to assess overall diet quality and nutrient adequacy, and test for association between weight status and diet in children from low socioeconomic status (SES) Hispanic families at high risk for obesity.

DESIGN

A cross-sectional study design was used to assess dietary intake in low-SES Hispanic children with and without overweight who were enrolled in the Viva la Familia Study. Multiple-pass 24-hour dietary recalls were recorded on two random, weekday occasions. Diet quality was evaluated according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Nutrient adequacy was assessed using z scores based on estimated average requirement or adequate intake.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

The study included 1,030 Hispanic children and adolescents, aged 4 to 19 years, in Houston, TX, who participated between November 2000 and August 2004.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

STATA software (version 9.1, 2006, STATA Corp, College Station, TX) was used for generalized estimating equations and random effects regression.

RESULTS

Diet quality did not adhere to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans for fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, fiber, added sugar, and sodium. Although energy intake was significantly higher in children with overweight, food sources, diet quality, macro- and micronutrient composition were similar between non-overweight and overweight children. Relative to estimated average requirements or adequate intake levels, mean nutrient intakes were adequate (70% to 98% probability) in the children without and with overweight, except for vitamins D and E, pantothenic acid, calcium, and potassium, for which z scores cannot be interpreted given the uncertainty of their adequate intake levels.

CONCLUSIONS

Whereas the diets of low-SES Hispanic children with and without overweight were adequate in most essential nutrients, other components of a healthful diet, which promote long-term health, were suboptimal. Knowledge of the diets of high-risk Hispanic children will inform nutritional interventions and policy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19465183

Citation

Wilson, Theresa A., et al. "Nutrient Adequacy and Diet Quality in Non-overweight and Overweight Hispanic Children of Low Socioeconomic Status: the Viva La Familia Study." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1012-21.
Wilson TA, Adolph AL, Butte NF. Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status: the Viva la Familia Study. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(6):1012-21.
Wilson, T. A., Adolph, A. L., & Butte, N. F. (2009). Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status: the Viva la Familia Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109(6), 1012-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2009.03.007
Wilson TA, Adolph AL, Butte NF. Nutrient Adequacy and Diet Quality in Non-overweight and Overweight Hispanic Children of Low Socioeconomic Status: the Viva La Familia Study. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(6):1012-21. PubMed PMID: 19465183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status: the Viva la Familia Study. AU - Wilson,Theresa A, AU - Adolph,Anne L, AU - Butte,Nancy F, PY - 2008/04/08/received PY - 2008/11/21/accepted PY - 2009/5/26/entrez PY - 2009/5/26/pubmed PY - 2009/6/10/medline SP - 1012 EP - 21 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 109 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The role of diet quality and nutrient adequacy in the etiology of childhood obesity is poorly understood. The specific aims of these analyses were to assess overall diet quality and nutrient adequacy, and test for association between weight status and diet in children from low socioeconomic status (SES) Hispanic families at high risk for obesity. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was used to assess dietary intake in low-SES Hispanic children with and without overweight who were enrolled in the Viva la Familia Study. Multiple-pass 24-hour dietary recalls were recorded on two random, weekday occasions. Diet quality was evaluated according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Nutrient adequacy was assessed using z scores based on estimated average requirement or adequate intake. SUBJECTS/SETTING: The study included 1,030 Hispanic children and adolescents, aged 4 to 19 years, in Houston, TX, who participated between November 2000 and August 2004. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: STATA software (version 9.1, 2006, STATA Corp, College Station, TX) was used for generalized estimating equations and random effects regression. RESULTS: Diet quality did not adhere to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans for fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, fiber, added sugar, and sodium. Although energy intake was significantly higher in children with overweight, food sources, diet quality, macro- and micronutrient composition were similar between non-overweight and overweight children. Relative to estimated average requirements or adequate intake levels, mean nutrient intakes were adequate (70% to 98% probability) in the children without and with overweight, except for vitamins D and E, pantothenic acid, calcium, and potassium, for which z scores cannot be interpreted given the uncertainty of their adequate intake levels. CONCLUSIONS: Whereas the diets of low-SES Hispanic children with and without overweight were adequate in most essential nutrients, other components of a healthful diet, which promote long-term health, were suboptimal. Knowledge of the diets of high-risk Hispanic children will inform nutritional interventions and policy. SN - 1878-3570 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19465183/Nutrient_adequacy_and_diet_quality_in_non_overweight_and_overweight_Hispanic_children_of_low_socioeconomic_status:_the_Viva_la_Familia_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(09)00294-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -