Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Soy proteins and isoflavones affect bone mineral density in older women: a randomized controlled trial.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Jul; 90(1):234-42.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Soy foods contain several components (isoflavones and amino acids) that potentially affect bone. Few long-term, large clinical trials of soy as a means of improving bone mineral density (BMD) in late postmenopausal women have been conducted.

OBJECTIVE

Our goal was to evaluate the long-term effect of dietary soy protein and/or soy isoflavone consumption on skeletal health in late postmenopausal women.

DESIGN

We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 131 healthy ambulatory women aged >60 y. Ninety-seven women completed the trial. After a 1-mo baseline period, subjects were randomly assigned into 1 of 4 intervention groups: soy protein (18 g) + isoflavone tablets (105 mg isoflavone aglycone equivalents), soy protein + placebo tablets, control protein + isoflavone tablets, and control protein + placebo tablets.

RESULTS

Consumption of protein powder and isoflavone pills did not differ between groups, and compliance with the study powder and pills was 80-90%. No significant differences in BMD were observed between groups from baseline to 1 y after the intervention or in BMD change between equol and non-equol producers. However, there were significant negative correlations between total dietary protein (per kg) and markers of bone turnover (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Because soy protein and isoflavones (either alone or together) did not affect BMD, they should not be considered as effective interventions for preserving skeletal health in older women. The negative correlation between dietary protein and bone turnover suggests that increasing protein intakes may suppress skeletal turnover. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00668447.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center on Aging, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19474141

Citation

Kenny, Anne M., et al. "Soy Proteins and Isoflavones Affect Bone Mineral Density in Older Women: a Randomized Controlled Trial." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 90, no. 1, 2009, pp. 234-42.
Kenny AM, Mangano KM, Abourizk RH, et al. Soy proteins and isoflavones affect bone mineral density in older women: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(1):234-42.
Kenny, A. M., Mangano, K. M., Abourizk, R. H., Bruno, R. S., Anamani, D. E., Kleppinger, A., Walsh, S. J., Prestwood, K. M., & Kerstetter, J. E. (2009). Soy proteins and isoflavones affect bone mineral density in older women: a randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 90(1), 234-42. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27600
Kenny AM, et al. Soy Proteins and Isoflavones Affect Bone Mineral Density in Older Women: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(1):234-42. PubMed PMID: 19474141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Soy proteins and isoflavones affect bone mineral density in older women: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Kenny,Anne M, AU - Mangano,Kelsey M, AU - Abourizk,Robin H, AU - Bruno,Richard S, AU - Anamani,Denise E, AU - Kleppinger,Alison, AU - Walsh,Stephen J, AU - Prestwood,Karen M, AU - Kerstetter,Jane E, Y1 - 2009/05/27/ PY - 2009/5/29/entrez PY - 2009/5/29/pubmed PY - 2009/7/9/medline SP - 234 EP - 42 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 90 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Soy foods contain several components (isoflavones and amino acids) that potentially affect bone. Few long-term, large clinical trials of soy as a means of improving bone mineral density (BMD) in late postmenopausal women have been conducted. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to evaluate the long-term effect of dietary soy protein and/or soy isoflavone consumption on skeletal health in late postmenopausal women. DESIGN: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 131 healthy ambulatory women aged >60 y. Ninety-seven women completed the trial. After a 1-mo baseline period, subjects were randomly assigned into 1 of 4 intervention groups: soy protein (18 g) + isoflavone tablets (105 mg isoflavone aglycone equivalents), soy protein + placebo tablets, control protein + isoflavone tablets, and control protein + placebo tablets. RESULTS: Consumption of protein powder and isoflavone pills did not differ between groups, and compliance with the study powder and pills was 80-90%. No significant differences in BMD were observed between groups from baseline to 1 y after the intervention or in BMD change between equol and non-equol producers. However, there were significant negative correlations between total dietary protein (per kg) and markers of bone turnover (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Because soy protein and isoflavones (either alone or together) did not affect BMD, they should not be considered as effective interventions for preserving skeletal health in older women. The negative correlation between dietary protein and bone turnover suggests that increasing protein intakes may suppress skeletal turnover. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00668447. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19474141/Soy_proteins_and_isoflavones_affect_bone_mineral_density_in_older_women:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27600 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -