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How leaky is the health career pipeline? Minority student achievement in college gateway courses.
Acad Med. 2009 Jun; 84(6):797-802.AM

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine whether underrepresented minority (URM) students receive lower grades than do non-URM students in college prehealth gateway courses; the extent to which lower grade performance might be explained by the differences in precollege academic achievement; and whether URM students are less likely than non-URM students to persist in completing at least four gateway courses.

METHOD

Administrative data were obtained from six California colleges on 15,000 college students who matriculated in the 1999-2000 or 2000-2001 academic years and enrolled in at least one college course required for application to medical or dental school ("gateway" courses). Students were compared across ethnic groups in gateway course grade performance and persistence in completing at least four gateway courses, using regression methods to control for students' college admission test scores and caliber of high school attended.

RESULTS

URM students received significantly lower grades on average in gateway courses than did white students. This gap persisted after adjusting for measures of prior academic performance. However, URM students were nearly as likely as white students to persist in completing at least four gateway courses. After accounting for the lower grades of URM students in their initial classes, URM students were more likely than white students to complete four or more gateway courses.

CONCLUSIONS

URM students experienced academic challenges, but many persist in their prehealth courses despite these challenges. Interventions at the college level to support URM student performance in gateway courses are particularly important for increasing the diversity of medical and dental schools.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. calexander@college.ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19474563

Citation

Alexander, Charles, et al. "How Leaky Is the Health Career Pipeline? Minority Student Achievement in College Gateway Courses." Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, vol. 84, no. 6, 2009, pp. 797-802.
Alexander C, Chen E, Grumbach K. How leaky is the health career pipeline? Minority student achievement in college gateway courses. Acad Med. 2009;84(6):797-802.
Alexander, C., Chen, E., & Grumbach, K. (2009). How leaky is the health career pipeline? Minority student achievement in college gateway courses. Academic Medicine : Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 84(6), 797-802. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181a3d948
Alexander C, Chen E, Grumbach K. How Leaky Is the Health Career Pipeline? Minority Student Achievement in College Gateway Courses. Acad Med. 2009;84(6):797-802. PubMed PMID: 19474563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How leaky is the health career pipeline? Minority student achievement in college gateway courses. AU - Alexander,Charles, AU - Chen,Eric, AU - Grumbach,Kevin, PY - 2009/5/29/entrez PY - 2009/5/29/pubmed PY - 2009/7/9/medline SP - 797 EP - 802 JF - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges JO - Acad Med VL - 84 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine whether underrepresented minority (URM) students receive lower grades than do non-URM students in college prehealth gateway courses; the extent to which lower grade performance might be explained by the differences in precollege academic achievement; and whether URM students are less likely than non-URM students to persist in completing at least four gateway courses. METHOD: Administrative data were obtained from six California colleges on 15,000 college students who matriculated in the 1999-2000 or 2000-2001 academic years and enrolled in at least one college course required for application to medical or dental school ("gateway" courses). Students were compared across ethnic groups in gateway course grade performance and persistence in completing at least four gateway courses, using regression methods to control for students' college admission test scores and caliber of high school attended. RESULTS: URM students received significantly lower grades on average in gateway courses than did white students. This gap persisted after adjusting for measures of prior academic performance. However, URM students were nearly as likely as white students to persist in completing at least four gateway courses. After accounting for the lower grades of URM students in their initial classes, URM students were more likely than white students to complete four or more gateway courses. CONCLUSIONS: URM students experienced academic challenges, but many persist in their prehealth courses despite these challenges. Interventions at the college level to support URM student performance in gateway courses are particularly important for increasing the diversity of medical and dental schools. SN - 1938-808X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19474563/How_leaky_is_the_health_career_pipeline_Minority_student_achievement_in_college_gateway_courses_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -