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Impact of ministry of health interventions on private medicine retailer knowledge and practices on anti-malarial treatment in Kenya.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2009 Jun; 80(6):905-13.AJ

Abstract

Small-scale interventions on training medicine retailers on malaria treatment improve over-the-counter medicine use, but there is little evidence on effectiveness when scaled up. This study evaluated the impact of Ministry of Health (MoH) training programs on the knowledge and practices of medicine retailers in three districts in Kenya. A cluster randomized trial was planned across 10 administrative divisions. Findings indicated that 30.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.3, 39.0) and 5.2% (95% CI: 2.1, 10.3) of program and control retailers, respectively, sold MoH amodiaquine with correct advice on use to surrogate clients (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.9, 26.9; P < 0.001). Similarly, 61.8% (95% CI: 54.2, 69.1) and 6.3% (95% CI: 2.7, 12.1) of program and control retailers, respectively, reported correct knowledge on dosing with amodiaquine (OR = 29.8; 95% CI: 8.2, 108.8). Large-scale retailer training programs within the national malaria control framework led to significant improvements in retailers' practices across three districts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kenya Medical Research Institute/Wellcome Trust Centre for Geographic Medicine Research-Coast, Kilifi, Kenya. Tabuya@kilifi.kemri-wellcome.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19478247

Citation

Abuya, Timothy, et al. "Impact of Ministry of Health Interventions On Private Medicine Retailer Knowledge and Practices On Anti-malarial Treatment in Kenya." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 80, no. 6, 2009, pp. 905-13.
Abuya T, Fegan G, Rowa Y, et al. Impact of ministry of health interventions on private medicine retailer knowledge and practices on anti-malarial treatment in Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2009;80(6):905-13.
Abuya, T., Fegan, G., Rowa, Y., Karisa, B., Ochola, S., Mutemi, W., & Marsh, V. (2009). Impact of ministry of health interventions on private medicine retailer knowledge and practices on anti-malarial treatment in Kenya. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 80(6), 905-13.
Abuya T, et al. Impact of Ministry of Health Interventions On Private Medicine Retailer Knowledge and Practices On Anti-malarial Treatment in Kenya. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2009;80(6):905-13. PubMed PMID: 19478247.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of ministry of health interventions on private medicine retailer knowledge and practices on anti-malarial treatment in Kenya. AU - Abuya,Timothy, AU - Fegan,Greg, AU - Rowa,Yvone, AU - Karisa,Baya, AU - Ochola,Sam, AU - Mutemi,Wilfred, AU - Marsh,Vicki, PY - 2009/5/30/entrez PY - 2009/5/30/pubmed PY - 2009/6/26/medline SP - 905 EP - 13 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 80 IS - 6 N2 - Small-scale interventions on training medicine retailers on malaria treatment improve over-the-counter medicine use, but there is little evidence on effectiveness when scaled up. This study evaluated the impact of Ministry of Health (MoH) training programs on the knowledge and practices of medicine retailers in three districts in Kenya. A cluster randomized trial was planned across 10 administrative divisions. Findings indicated that 30.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.3, 39.0) and 5.2% (95% CI: 2.1, 10.3) of program and control retailers, respectively, sold MoH amodiaquine with correct advice on use to surrogate clients (OR = 8.8; 95% CI: 2.9, 26.9; P < 0.001). Similarly, 61.8% (95% CI: 54.2, 69.1) and 6.3% (95% CI: 2.7, 12.1) of program and control retailers, respectively, reported correct knowledge on dosing with amodiaquine (OR = 29.8; 95% CI: 8.2, 108.8). Large-scale retailer training programs within the national malaria control framework led to significant improvements in retailers' practices across three districts. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19478247/Impact_of_ministry_of_health_interventions_on_private_medicine_retailer_knowledge_and_practices_on_anti_malarial_treatment_in_Kenya_ L2 - https://core.ac.uk/reader/19498287?utm_source=linkout DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -