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Serum cross-reactive antibody response to a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus after vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 May 22; 58(19):521-4.MM

Abstract

As of May 19, 2009, a total of 5,469 confirmed or probable cases of human infection with a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus had been documented in 47 states and the District of Columbia. In addition, the virus had spread to 41 countries, with a total of 4,774 cases reported in countries outside the United States. Because producing a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus vaccine will take several months, determining whether receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine might offer any protection against the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus is important. Therefore, using stored serum specimens collected during previous vaccine studies, CDC assessed the level of cross-reactive antibody to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus in cohorts of children and adults before and after they had been vaccinated with the 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, or 2008-09 influenza season vaccines. The results indicated that before vaccination, no cross-reactive antibody to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus existed among children. Among adults, before vaccination, cross-reactive antibody was detected in 6%--9% of those aged 18--64 years and in 33% of those aged >60 years. Previous vaccination of children with any of four seasonal trivalent, inactivated influenza vaccines (TIV) or with live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) did not elicit a cross-reactive antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. Among adults, vaccination with seasonal TIV resulted in a twofold increase in cross-reactive antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus among those aged 18--64 years, compared with a twelvefold to nineteenfold increase in cross-reactive antibody response to the seasonal H1N1 strain; no increase in cross-reactive antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus was observed among adults aged >60 years. These data suggest that receipt of recent (2005--2009) seasonal influenza vaccines is unlikely to elicit a protective antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus.

Authors

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19478718

Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Serum Cross-reactive Antibody Response to a Novel Influenza a (H1N1) Virus After Vaccination With Seasonal Influenza Vaccine." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 58, no. 19, 2009, pp. 521-4.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Serum cross-reactive antibody response to a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus after vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009;58(19):521-4.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2009). Serum cross-reactive antibody response to a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus after vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 58(19), 521-4.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Serum Cross-reactive Antibody Response to a Novel Influenza a (H1N1) Virus After Vaccination With Seasonal Influenza Vaccine. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 May 22;58(19):521-4. PubMed PMID: 19478718.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum cross-reactive antibody response to a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus after vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine. A1 - ,, PY - 2009/5/30/entrez PY - 2009/5/30/pubmed PY - 2009/6/3/medline SP - 521 EP - 4 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. VL - 58 IS - 19 N2 - As of May 19, 2009, a total of 5,469 confirmed or probable cases of human infection with a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus had been documented in 47 states and the District of Columbia. In addition, the virus had spread to 41 countries, with a total of 4,774 cases reported in countries outside the United States. Because producing a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus vaccine will take several months, determining whether receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine might offer any protection against the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus is important. Therefore, using stored serum specimens collected during previous vaccine studies, CDC assessed the level of cross-reactive antibody to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus in cohorts of children and adults before and after they had been vaccinated with the 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, or 2008-09 influenza season vaccines. The results indicated that before vaccination, no cross-reactive antibody to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus existed among children. Among adults, before vaccination, cross-reactive antibody was detected in 6%--9% of those aged 18--64 years and in 33% of those aged >60 years. Previous vaccination of children with any of four seasonal trivalent, inactivated influenza vaccines (TIV) or with live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) did not elicit a cross-reactive antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. Among adults, vaccination with seasonal TIV resulted in a twofold increase in cross-reactive antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus among those aged 18--64 years, compared with a twelvefold to nineteenfold increase in cross-reactive antibody response to the seasonal H1N1 strain; no increase in cross-reactive antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus was observed among adults aged >60 years. These data suggest that receipt of recent (2005--2009) seasonal influenza vaccines is unlikely to elicit a protective antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19478718/Serum_cross_reactive_antibody_response_to_a_novel_influenza_A__H1N1__virus_after_vaccination_with_seasonal_influenza_vaccine_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5819a1.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -