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Effects of prosodic familiarity on the automatic processing of words in the human brain.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2009 Sep; 73(3):362-8.IJ

Abstract

We aimed to determine the effect of prosodic familiarity on automatic word processing in the brain by comparing the mismatch negativity (MMN) components of the event-related brain potential (ERP) elicited by words and pseudowords with familiar and unfamiliar stress patterns. The results show that the MMN was elicited by a change from unfamiliar to familiar words and a change from a familiar to an unfamiliar word-stress pattern.When familiar words were accompanied by an unfamiliar stress pattern, the MMN response was significantly delayed in comparison with the familiar words with a familiar stress pattern, suggesting that an unfamiliar prosodic pattern increased the computational needs in word recognition but did not prevent it. In addition to the effects of familiarity on the MMN, we found a positive brain response peaking between 100 and 200 ms that could be associated with the processing of familiar auditory objects. The present results expand the understanding of the early stages of speech processing in the human brain by demonstrating how automatic word processing is affected by prosodic cues that play an important role in the segmentation of continuous speech.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, P.O. Box 9, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. sari.ylinen@helsinki.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19482051

Citation

Ylinen, Sari, et al. "Effects of Prosodic Familiarity On the Automatic Processing of Words in the Human Brain." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 73, no. 3, 2009, pp. 362-8.
Ylinen S, Strelnikov K, Huotilainen M, et al. Effects of prosodic familiarity on the automatic processing of words in the human brain. Int J Psychophysiol. 2009;73(3):362-8.
Ylinen, S., Strelnikov, K., Huotilainen, M., & Näätänen, R. (2009). Effects of prosodic familiarity on the automatic processing of words in the human brain. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 73(3), 362-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2009.05.013
Ylinen S, et al. Effects of Prosodic Familiarity On the Automatic Processing of Words in the Human Brain. Int J Psychophysiol. 2009;73(3):362-8. PubMed PMID: 19482051.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of prosodic familiarity on the automatic processing of words in the human brain. AU - Ylinen,Sari, AU - Strelnikov,Kuzma, AU - Huotilainen,Minna, AU - Näätänen,Risto, Y1 - 2009/05/29/ PY - 2008/11/17/received PY - 2009/05/22/revised PY - 2009/05/25/accepted PY - 2009/6/2/entrez PY - 2009/6/2/pubmed PY - 2009/10/20/medline SP - 362 EP - 8 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 73 IS - 3 N2 - We aimed to determine the effect of prosodic familiarity on automatic word processing in the brain by comparing the mismatch negativity (MMN) components of the event-related brain potential (ERP) elicited by words and pseudowords with familiar and unfamiliar stress patterns. The results show that the MMN was elicited by a change from unfamiliar to familiar words and a change from a familiar to an unfamiliar word-stress pattern.When familiar words were accompanied by an unfamiliar stress pattern, the MMN response was significantly delayed in comparison with the familiar words with a familiar stress pattern, suggesting that an unfamiliar prosodic pattern increased the computational needs in word recognition but did not prevent it. In addition to the effects of familiarity on the MMN, we found a positive brain response peaking between 100 and 200 ms that could be associated with the processing of familiar auditory objects. The present results expand the understanding of the early stages of speech processing in the human brain by demonstrating how automatic word processing is affected by prosodic cues that play an important role in the segmentation of continuous speech. SN - 1872-7697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19482051/Effects_of_prosodic_familiarity_on_the_automatic_processing_of_words_in_the_human_brain_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(09)00143-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -