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Behavioral effects of agmatine in naive rats are task- and delay-dependent.
Neuroscience. 2009 Sep 29; 163(1):82-96.N

Abstract

The present study systematically investigated the effects of agmatine administered i.p. in several commonly used behavioral tasks. In Experiment 1, pre-test treatment of agmatine (1 and 40 mg/kg) appeared to improve animals' performance in the water maze probe test conducted 24 h, but not 120 s, after training, when the effect was evaluated within subjects. In Experiment 2, pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) did not affect animals' performance in the open field, and the place navigation, probe tests (1-4 and 6), reversal test and cued navigation in the water maze, but significantly facilitated performance in probe 5 which was conducted 96 h after training. In Experiment 3, rats with pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) were less anxious relative to the controls, with no performance changes in the open field. In the water maze task, post-training agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) did not affect place and cued navigation, but significantly improved animals' performance in the probe test conducted 24 h after training and the reversal test. In the working memory version of the task, agmatine treated rats took significantly less time and generated markedly shorter path length to reach the platform at the 180 s, but not 30 s, delay relative to the controls. In the object recognition task, rats with pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) spent significantly more time exploring displaced objects, but not novel object, as compared to the controls. In Experiment 4, pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) had no effect on the task acquisition in the delayed non-match to position task in the T-maze, but significantly facilitated performance at the 600 s delay. These results suggest that the behavioral effects of agmatine are task- and delay-dependent, and agmatine facilitates memory particularly when the task difficulty is increased due to memory trace decay and/or greater interference.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. ping.liu@stonebow.otago.ac.nzNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19482065

Citation

Liu, P, and N D. Collie. "Behavioral Effects of Agmatine in Naive Rats Are Task- and Delay-dependent." Neuroscience, vol. 163, no. 1, 2009, pp. 82-96.
Liu P, Collie ND. Behavioral effects of agmatine in naive rats are task- and delay-dependent. Neuroscience. 2009;163(1):82-96.
Liu, P., & Collie, N. D. (2009). Behavioral effects of agmatine in naive rats are task- and delay-dependent. Neuroscience, 163(1), 82-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.05.061
Liu P, Collie ND. Behavioral Effects of Agmatine in Naive Rats Are Task- and Delay-dependent. Neuroscience. 2009 Sep 29;163(1):82-96. PubMed PMID: 19482065.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral effects of agmatine in naive rats are task- and delay-dependent. AU - Liu,P, AU - Collie,N D, Y1 - 2009/05/29/ PY - 2009/04/21/received PY - 2009/05/22/revised PY - 2009/05/26/accepted PY - 2009/6/2/entrez PY - 2009/6/2/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 82 EP - 96 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 163 IS - 1 N2 - The present study systematically investigated the effects of agmatine administered i.p. in several commonly used behavioral tasks. In Experiment 1, pre-test treatment of agmatine (1 and 40 mg/kg) appeared to improve animals' performance in the water maze probe test conducted 24 h, but not 120 s, after training, when the effect was evaluated within subjects. In Experiment 2, pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) did not affect animals' performance in the open field, and the place navigation, probe tests (1-4 and 6), reversal test and cued navigation in the water maze, but significantly facilitated performance in probe 5 which was conducted 96 h after training. In Experiment 3, rats with pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) were less anxious relative to the controls, with no performance changes in the open field. In the water maze task, post-training agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) did not affect place and cued navigation, but significantly improved animals' performance in the probe test conducted 24 h after training and the reversal test. In the working memory version of the task, agmatine treated rats took significantly less time and generated markedly shorter path length to reach the platform at the 180 s, but not 30 s, delay relative to the controls. In the object recognition task, rats with pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) spent significantly more time exploring displaced objects, but not novel object, as compared to the controls. In Experiment 4, pre-test agmatine treatment (40 mg/kg) had no effect on the task acquisition in the delayed non-match to position task in the T-maze, but significantly facilitated performance at the 600 s delay. These results suggest that the behavioral effects of agmatine are task- and delay-dependent, and agmatine facilitates memory particularly when the task difficulty is increased due to memory trace decay and/or greater interference. SN - 1873-7544 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19482065/Behavioral_effects_of_agmatine_in_naive_rats_are_task__and_delay_dependent_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(09)00971-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -