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Acute illness care patterns change with use of telemedicine.
Pediatrics. 2009 Jun; 123(6):e989-95.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Health-e-Access, a telemedicine service providing care for acute illnesses in children, has delivered >6500 telemedicine visits from 10 primary care practices in Rochester, New York, by using telemedicine access at 22 child care and school sites. The goal was to assess the hypotheses that children served by Health-e-Access received health care more often for acute illnesses but had fewer emergency department (ED) visits and lower health care expenditures than did children without access through this service.

METHODS

By using insurance claims, this case study compared utilization (starting in May 2001) of telemedicine, office, or ED care for children with versus without telemedicine access. Children included in analyses had > or =6 consecutive insurance-covered months through July 2007. Claims data captured all utilization. A total of 19 652 child-months from 1216 children with telemedicine access were matched with respect to age, gender, socioeconomic status, and season with child-months for children without telemedicine availability.

RESULTS

The mean age at utilization was 6.71 years, with 79% of all child-months being covered by Medicaid managed care. The overall utilization rate was 305.1 visits per 100 child-years. In multivariate analyses with adjustment for potential confounders, overall illness-related utilization rates (in-person or telemedicine visits per 100 child-years) for all sites were 23.5% greater for children with telemedicine access than for control children, but ED utilization was 22.2% less.

CONCLUSION

The Health-e-Access telemedicine model holds potential to reduce health care costs, mostly through replacement of ED visits for nonemergency problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. ken_mcconnochie@urmc.rochester.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19482750

Citation

McConnochie, Kenneth M., et al. "Acute Illness Care Patterns Change With Use of Telemedicine." Pediatrics, vol. 123, no. 6, 2009, pp. e989-95.
McConnochie KM, Wood NE, Herendeen NE, et al. Acute illness care patterns change with use of telemedicine. Pediatrics. 2009;123(6):e989-95.
McConnochie, K. M., Wood, N. E., Herendeen, N. E., Ng, P. K., Noyes, K., Wang, H., & Roghmann, K. J. (2009). Acute illness care patterns change with use of telemedicine. Pediatrics, 123(6), e989-95. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-2698
McConnochie KM, et al. Acute Illness Care Patterns Change With Use of Telemedicine. Pediatrics. 2009;123(6):e989-95. PubMed PMID: 19482750.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute illness care patterns change with use of telemedicine. AU - McConnochie,Kenneth M, AU - Wood,Nancy E, AU - Herendeen,Neil E, AU - Ng,Phillip K, AU - Noyes,Katia, AU - Wang,Hongyue, AU - Roghmann,Klaus J, PY - 2009/6/2/entrez PY - 2009/6/2/pubmed PY - 2009/6/18/medline SP - e989 EP - 95 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 123 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Health-e-Access, a telemedicine service providing care for acute illnesses in children, has delivered >6500 telemedicine visits from 10 primary care practices in Rochester, New York, by using telemedicine access at 22 child care and school sites. The goal was to assess the hypotheses that children served by Health-e-Access received health care more often for acute illnesses but had fewer emergency department (ED) visits and lower health care expenditures than did children without access through this service. METHODS: By using insurance claims, this case study compared utilization (starting in May 2001) of telemedicine, office, or ED care for children with versus without telemedicine access. Children included in analyses had > or =6 consecutive insurance-covered months through July 2007. Claims data captured all utilization. A total of 19 652 child-months from 1216 children with telemedicine access were matched with respect to age, gender, socioeconomic status, and season with child-months for children without telemedicine availability. RESULTS: The mean age at utilization was 6.71 years, with 79% of all child-months being covered by Medicaid managed care. The overall utilization rate was 305.1 visits per 100 child-years. In multivariate analyses with adjustment for potential confounders, overall illness-related utilization rates (in-person or telemedicine visits per 100 child-years) for all sites were 23.5% greater for children with telemedicine access than for control children, but ED utilization was 22.2% less. CONCLUSION: The Health-e-Access telemedicine model holds potential to reduce health care costs, mostly through replacement of ED visits for nonemergency problems. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19482750/Acute_illness_care_patterns_change_with_use_of_telemedicine_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19482750 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -