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Parental refusal of pertussis vaccination is associated with an increased risk of pertussis infection in children.
Pediatrics. 2009 Jun; 123(6):1446-51.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to determine if children who contracted pertussis infection were more likely to have parents who refused pertussis vaccinations than a similar group of children who did not develop pertussis infection.

METHODS

We conducted a case-control study of children enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente of Colorado health plan between 1996 and 2007. Each pertussis case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls. Pertussis case status and vaccination status were ascertained by medical chart review.

RESULTS

We identified 156 laboratory-confirmed pertussis cases and 595 matched controls. There were 18 (12%) pertussis vaccine refusers among the cases and 3 (0.5%) pertussis vaccine refusers among the controls. Children of parents who refused pertussis immunizations were at an increased risk for pertussis compared with children of parents who accepted vaccinations. In a secondary case-control analysis of children continuously enrolled in Kaiser Permanente of Colorado from 2 to 20 months of age, vaccine refusal was associated with a similarly increased risk of pertussis. In the entire Kaiser Permanente of Colorado pediatric population, 11% of all pertussis cases were attributed to parental vaccine refusal.

CONCLUSIONS

Children of parents who refuse pertussis immunizations are at high risk for pertussis infection relative to vaccinated children. Herd immunity does not seem to completely protect unvaccinated children from pertussis. These findings stress the need to further understand why parents refuse immunizations and to develop strategies for conveying the risks and benefits of immunizations to parents more effectively.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Institute for Health Research, PO Box 378066, Denver, CO 80237-8066, USA. jason.m.glanz@kp.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19482753

Citation

Glanz, Jason M., et al. "Parental Refusal of Pertussis Vaccination Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Pertussis Infection in Children." Pediatrics, vol. 123, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1446-51.
Glanz JM, McClure DL, Magid DJ, et al. Parental refusal of pertussis vaccination is associated with an increased risk of pertussis infection in children. Pediatrics. 2009;123(6):1446-51.
Glanz, J. M., McClure, D. L., Magid, D. J., Daley, M. F., France, E. K., Salmon, D. A., & Hambidge, S. J. (2009). Parental refusal of pertussis vaccination is associated with an increased risk of pertussis infection in children. Pediatrics, 123(6), 1446-51. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-2150
Glanz JM, et al. Parental Refusal of Pertussis Vaccination Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Pertussis Infection in Children. Pediatrics. 2009;123(6):1446-51. PubMed PMID: 19482753.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental refusal of pertussis vaccination is associated with an increased risk of pertussis infection in children. AU - Glanz,Jason M, AU - McClure,David L, AU - Magid,David J, AU - Daley,Matthew F, AU - France,Eric K, AU - Salmon,Daniel A, AU - Hambidge,Simon J, PY - 2009/6/2/entrez PY - 2009/6/2/pubmed PY - 2009/6/18/medline SP - 1446 EP - 51 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 123 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine if children who contracted pertussis infection were more likely to have parents who refused pertussis vaccinations than a similar group of children who did not develop pertussis infection. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of children enrolled in the Kaiser Permanente of Colorado health plan between 1996 and 2007. Each pertussis case was matched to 4 randomly selected controls. Pertussis case status and vaccination status were ascertained by medical chart review. RESULTS: We identified 156 laboratory-confirmed pertussis cases and 595 matched controls. There were 18 (12%) pertussis vaccine refusers among the cases and 3 (0.5%) pertussis vaccine refusers among the controls. Children of parents who refused pertussis immunizations were at an increased risk for pertussis compared with children of parents who accepted vaccinations. In a secondary case-control analysis of children continuously enrolled in Kaiser Permanente of Colorado from 2 to 20 months of age, vaccine refusal was associated with a similarly increased risk of pertussis. In the entire Kaiser Permanente of Colorado pediatric population, 11% of all pertussis cases were attributed to parental vaccine refusal. CONCLUSIONS: Children of parents who refuse pertussis immunizations are at high risk for pertussis infection relative to vaccinated children. Herd immunity does not seem to completely protect unvaccinated children from pertussis. These findings stress the need to further understand why parents refuse immunizations and to develop strategies for conveying the risks and benefits of immunizations to parents more effectively. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19482753/Parental_refusal_of_pertussis_vaccination_is_associated_with_an_increased_risk_of_pertussis_infection_in_children_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19482753 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -