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Increased infant human immunodeficiency virus-type one free survival at one year of age in sub-saharan Africa with maternal use of highly active antiretroviral therapy during breast-feeding.
Pediatr Infect Dis J 2009; 28(6):483-7PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reduction of HIV-1 breast-feeding transmission remains a challenge for prevention of pediatric infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. Provision of formula decreases transmission but often increases child mortality in this setting.

METHODS

A prospective observational cohort study of HIV-1 exposed infants of mothers receiving pre and postnatal medical care at Drug Resource Enhancement Against AIDS and Malnutrition centers in Mozambique was conducted. Live-born infants of HIV-1-infected women receiving medical care were enrolled. HIV-1 testing was performed at 1, 6, and 12 months of age using branched DNA. Mothers were counseled to breast-feed exclusively for 6 months and were provided HAART antenatally and postnatally for the first 6 months. Women with CD4 cell counts less than 350/cmm at baseline continued HAART indefinitely.

RESULTS

Of 341 infants followed from birth, 313 mother-infant pairs (92%) completed 6 months and 283 (83%) completed 12 months of follow-up. HIV-1 diagnosis was ascertained in 287 infants (84%) including 4 who died. There were 8 cases of HIV-1 transmission: 4 of 341 (1.2%) at 1 month, 2 of 313 (0.6%) at 6 months, and 2 of 276 (0.7%) at 12 months (cumulative rate: 2.8%). Two mothers (0.6%) and 11 infants (3.2%) died. Maternal and infant mortality rates were 587 of 100,000 and 33 of 1000, while country rates are 1000 of 100,000 and 101 of 1000. HIV risk reduction was 93% and HIV-free survival at 12 months was 94%.

CONCLUSIONS

Late postnatal transmission of HIV-1 is significantly decreased by maternal use of HAART with high infant survival rates up to 12 months of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, LUMSA University, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19483516

Citation

Marazzi, Maria Cristina, et al. "Increased Infant Human Immunodeficiency Virus-type One Free Survival at One Year of Age in Sub-saharan Africa With Maternal Use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy During Breast-feeding." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 28, no. 6, 2009, pp. 483-7.
Marazzi MC, Nielsen-Saines K, Buonomo E, et al. Increased infant human immunodeficiency virus-type one free survival at one year of age in sub-saharan Africa with maternal use of highly active antiretroviral therapy during breast-feeding. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009;28(6):483-7.
Marazzi, M. C., Nielsen-Saines, K., Buonomo, E., Scarcella, P., Germano, P., Majid, N. A., ... Palombi, L. (2009). Increased infant human immunodeficiency virus-type one free survival at one year of age in sub-saharan Africa with maternal use of highly active antiretroviral therapy during breast-feeding. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 28(6), pp. 483-7. doi:10.1097/INF.0b013e3181950c56.
Marazzi MC, et al. Increased Infant Human Immunodeficiency Virus-type One Free Survival at One Year of Age in Sub-saharan Africa With Maternal Use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy During Breast-feeding. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2009;28(6):483-7. PubMed PMID: 19483516.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased infant human immunodeficiency virus-type one free survival at one year of age in sub-saharan Africa with maternal use of highly active antiretroviral therapy during breast-feeding. AU - Marazzi,Maria Cristina, AU - Nielsen-Saines,Karin, AU - Buonomo,Ersilia, AU - Scarcella,Paola, AU - Germano,Paola, AU - Majid,Nuria Abdul, AU - Zimba,Ines, AU - Ceffa,Susanna, AU - Palombi,Leonardo, PY - 2009/6/2/entrez PY - 2009/6/2/pubmed PY - 2009/9/1/medline SP - 483 EP - 7 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J. VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reduction of HIV-1 breast-feeding transmission remains a challenge for prevention of pediatric infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. Provision of formula decreases transmission but often increases child mortality in this setting. METHODS: A prospective observational cohort study of HIV-1 exposed infants of mothers receiving pre and postnatal medical care at Drug Resource Enhancement Against AIDS and Malnutrition centers in Mozambique was conducted. Live-born infants of HIV-1-infected women receiving medical care were enrolled. HIV-1 testing was performed at 1, 6, and 12 months of age using branched DNA. Mothers were counseled to breast-feed exclusively for 6 months and were provided HAART antenatally and postnatally for the first 6 months. Women with CD4 cell counts less than 350/cmm at baseline continued HAART indefinitely. RESULTS: Of 341 infants followed from birth, 313 mother-infant pairs (92%) completed 6 months and 283 (83%) completed 12 months of follow-up. HIV-1 diagnosis was ascertained in 287 infants (84%) including 4 who died. There were 8 cases of HIV-1 transmission: 4 of 341 (1.2%) at 1 month, 2 of 313 (0.6%) at 6 months, and 2 of 276 (0.7%) at 12 months (cumulative rate: 2.8%). Two mothers (0.6%) and 11 infants (3.2%) died. Maternal and infant mortality rates were 587 of 100,000 and 33 of 1000, while country rates are 1000 of 100,000 and 101 of 1000. HIV risk reduction was 93% and HIV-free survival at 12 months was 94%. CONCLUSIONS: Late postnatal transmission of HIV-1 is significantly decreased by maternal use of HAART with high infant survival rates up to 12 months of age. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19483516/Increased_infant_human_immunodeficiency_virus_type_one_free_survival_at_one_year_of_age_in_sub_saharan_Africa_with_maternal_use_of_highly_active_antiretroviral_therapy_during_breast_feeding_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=19483516 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -