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[Propofol sedation administered by nurses for endoscopic procedures].
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 May 25; 171(22):1840-3.UL

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

As an increasing number of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures are performed endoscopically, the demand for sufficient sedation during endoscopy is rising. Propofol sedation administered by nurses (NAPS) has gained increasing popularity. NAPS was introduced at Gentofte Hospital in September 2007 after structured training at Roque Valley Surgical Center in Medford, Oregon, USA. The aim of the present study is to present our results with NAPS.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Patients referred for endoscopy were monitored with regard to blood pressure, pulse oxymetry, electrocardiography and evaluation of their respiration during and after the procedure.

RESULTS

A total of 229 patients (233 endoscopic procedures) were included (ASA I: 68 (29%), ASA II: 116 (50%), ASA III: 44 (19%), ASA IV: 1 (0.4%)). The median propofol administration was 330 mg (variance 100-1,700 mg). Hypoxia, defined as oxygen < 92%, was observed in 18 patients. The hypoxia lasted less than 30 seconds in eight patients and between 30-60 seconds in eight cases. Two patients had hypoxia for a period exceeding 60 seconds. Propofol administration was discontinued in all 18 cases and increased oxygen flow was administered via a nasal tube. Short lasting manual mask ventilation was instituted in five patients. No serious events related to sedation were seen.

CONCLUSIONS

NAPS seem to be a suitable method for sedation in endoscopy and should be implemented in Denmark. However, proper training is required in collaboration with anaesthesiologists.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gentofte Hospital, Kirurgisk Gastroenterologisk Afdeling, DK-2900 Hellerup. Pevi@geh.regionh.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

dan

PubMed ID

19486612

Citation

Vilmann, Peter, et al. "[Propofol Sedation Administered By Nurses for Endoscopic Procedures]." Ugeskrift for Laeger, vol. 171, no. 22, 2009, pp. 1840-3.
Vilmann P, Hornslet P, Simmons H, et al. [Propofol sedation administered by nurses for endoscopic procedures]. Ugeskr Laeger. 2009;171(22):1840-3.
Vilmann, P., Hornslet, P., Simmons, H., Hammering, A., & Clementsen, P. (2009). [Propofol sedation administered by nurses for endoscopic procedures]. Ugeskrift for Laeger, 171(22), 1840-3.
Vilmann P, et al. [Propofol Sedation Administered By Nurses for Endoscopic Procedures]. Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 May 25;171(22):1840-3. PubMed PMID: 19486612.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Propofol sedation administered by nurses for endoscopic procedures]. AU - Vilmann,Peter, AU - Hornslet,Pernille, AU - Simmons,Hanne, AU - Hammering,Anne, AU - Clementsen,Paul, PY - 2009/6/3/entrez PY - 2009/6/3/pubmed PY - 2009/6/12/medline SP - 1840 EP - 3 JF - Ugeskrift for laeger JO - Ugeskr Laeger VL - 171 IS - 22 N2 - INTRODUCTION: As an increasing number of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures are performed endoscopically, the demand for sufficient sedation during endoscopy is rising. Propofol sedation administered by nurses (NAPS) has gained increasing popularity. NAPS was introduced at Gentofte Hospital in September 2007 after structured training at Roque Valley Surgical Center in Medford, Oregon, USA. The aim of the present study is to present our results with NAPS. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients referred for endoscopy were monitored with regard to blood pressure, pulse oxymetry, electrocardiography and evaluation of their respiration during and after the procedure. RESULTS: A total of 229 patients (233 endoscopic procedures) were included (ASA I: 68 (29%), ASA II: 116 (50%), ASA III: 44 (19%), ASA IV: 1 (0.4%)). The median propofol administration was 330 mg (variance 100-1,700 mg). Hypoxia, defined as oxygen < 92%, was observed in 18 patients. The hypoxia lasted less than 30 seconds in eight patients and between 30-60 seconds in eight cases. Two patients had hypoxia for a period exceeding 60 seconds. Propofol administration was discontinued in all 18 cases and increased oxygen flow was administered via a nasal tube. Short lasting manual mask ventilation was instituted in five patients. No serious events related to sedation were seen. CONCLUSIONS: NAPS seem to be a suitable method for sedation in endoscopy and should be implemented in Denmark. However, proper training is required in collaboration with anaesthesiologists. SN - 1603-6824 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19486612/[Propofol_sedation_administered_by_nurses_for_endoscopic_procedures]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -