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Postexercise rehydration in man: the effects of osmolality and carbohydrate content of ingested drinks.
Nutrition. 2009 Sep; 25(9):905-13.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study investigated the effect of the osmolality and carbohydrate content of drinks on their rehydration effectiveness after exercise-induced dehydration.

METHODS

Six healthy male volunteers were dehydrated by 1.9+/-0.1% of body mass by intermittent cycle ergometer exercise in the heat before ingesting one of three solutions with different carbohydrate contents and osmolalities over a period of 1h. Thirty minutes after the cessation of exercise, subjects drank a volume that amounted to 150% (130-150, median [range]) of their body mass loss. Drinks contained 25 mmol/L Na(+) and 0%, 2%, or 10% glucose with osmolalities of (mean+/-SD) 79+/-4, 193+/-5, and 667+/-12 mosm/kg, respectively. Blood and urine samples were collected before exercise, after exercise, and 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6h after the end of the rehydration period.

RESULTS

Significantly more of the ingested fluid was retained in the 10% trial (46+/-9%) than in the 0% trial (27+/-13%), with 40+/-14% retained in the 2% trial. Subjects remained euhydrated for 1h longer in the 10% glucose trial than in the 2% glucose trial. In the 2% glucose trial, plasma volume was elevated immediately after and 1h after rehydration.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests that, following the rehydration protocol used, hypertonic glucose-sodium drinks may be more effective at restoring and maintaining hydration status after sweat loss than more dilute solutions when the sodium concentration is comparable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19487107

Citation

Evans, Gethin H., et al. "Postexercise Rehydration in Man: the Effects of Osmolality and Carbohydrate Content of Ingested Drinks." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 25, no. 9, 2009, pp. 905-13.
Evans GH, Shirreffs SM, Maughan RJ. Postexercise rehydration in man: the effects of osmolality and carbohydrate content of ingested drinks. Nutrition. 2009;25(9):905-13.
Evans, G. H., Shirreffs, S. M., & Maughan, R. J. (2009). Postexercise rehydration in man: the effects of osmolality and carbohydrate content of ingested drinks. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 25(9), 905-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2008.12.014
Evans GH, Shirreffs SM, Maughan RJ. Postexercise Rehydration in Man: the Effects of Osmolality and Carbohydrate Content of Ingested Drinks. Nutrition. 2009;25(9):905-13. PubMed PMID: 19487107.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postexercise rehydration in man: the effects of osmolality and carbohydrate content of ingested drinks. AU - Evans,Gethin H, AU - Shirreffs,Susan M, AU - Maughan,Ronald J, Y1 - 2009/05/31/ PY - 2008/09/04/received PY - 2008/11/14/revised PY - 2008/12/23/accepted PY - 2009/6/3/entrez PY - 2009/6/3/pubmed PY - 2009/10/24/medline SP - 905 EP - 13 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 25 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effect of the osmolality and carbohydrate content of drinks on their rehydration effectiveness after exercise-induced dehydration. METHODS: Six healthy male volunteers were dehydrated by 1.9+/-0.1% of body mass by intermittent cycle ergometer exercise in the heat before ingesting one of three solutions with different carbohydrate contents and osmolalities over a period of 1h. Thirty minutes after the cessation of exercise, subjects drank a volume that amounted to 150% (130-150, median [range]) of their body mass loss. Drinks contained 25 mmol/L Na(+) and 0%, 2%, or 10% glucose with osmolalities of (mean+/-SD) 79+/-4, 193+/-5, and 667+/-12 mosm/kg, respectively. Blood and urine samples were collected before exercise, after exercise, and 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6h after the end of the rehydration period. RESULTS: Significantly more of the ingested fluid was retained in the 10% trial (46+/-9%) than in the 0% trial (27+/-13%), with 40+/-14% retained in the 2% trial. Subjects remained euhydrated for 1h longer in the 10% glucose trial than in the 2% glucose trial. In the 2% glucose trial, plasma volume was elevated immediately after and 1h after rehydration. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that, following the rehydration protocol used, hypertonic glucose-sodium drinks may be more effective at restoring and maintaining hydration status after sweat loss than more dilute solutions when the sodium concentration is comparable. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19487107/Postexercise_rehydration_in_man:_the_effects_of_osmolality_and_carbohydrate_content_of_ingested_drinks_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(09)00113-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -