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Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy and lactation may decrease the risk of infant allergy.
Acta Paediatr 2009; 98(9):1461-7AP

Abstract

Maternal intake of omega-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) during pregnancy has decreased, possibly contributing to a current increased risk of childhood allergy.

AIM

To describe the effects of maternal omega-3 long-chain PUFA supplementation during pregnancy and lactation on the incidence of allergic disease in infancy.

METHODS

One hundred and forty-five pregnant women, affected by allergy themselves or having a husband or previous child with allergies, were included in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Daily maternal supplementation with either 1.6 g eicosapentaenoic acid and 1.1 g docosahexaenoic acid or placebo was given from the 25(th) gestational week to average 3-4 months of breastfeeding. Skin prick tests, detection of circulating specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and clinical examinations of the infants were performed.

RESULTS

The period prevalence of food allergy was lower in the omega-3 group (1/52, 2%) compared to the placebo group (10/65, 15%, p < 0.05) as well as the incidence of IgE-associated eczema (omega-3 group: 4/52, 8%; placebo group: 15/63, 24%, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Maternal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may decrease the risk of food allergy and IgE-associated eczema during the first year of life in infants with a family history of allergic disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. catrin.furuhjelm@lio.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19489765

Citation

Furuhjelm, Catrin, et al. "Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy and Lactation May Decrease the Risk of Infant Allergy." Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), vol. 98, no. 9, 2009, pp. 1461-7.
Furuhjelm C, Warstedt K, Larsson J, et al. Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy and lactation may decrease the risk of infant allergy. Acta Paediatr. 2009;98(9):1461-7.
Furuhjelm, C., Warstedt, K., Larsson, J., Fredriksson, M., Böttcher, M. F., Fälth-Magnusson, K., & Duchén, K. (2009). Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy and lactation may decrease the risk of infant allergy. Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992), 98(9), pp. 1461-7. doi:10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01355.x.
Furuhjelm C, et al. Fish Oil Supplementation in Pregnancy and Lactation May Decrease the Risk of Infant Allergy. Acta Paediatr. 2009;98(9):1461-7. PubMed PMID: 19489765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish oil supplementation in pregnancy and lactation may decrease the risk of infant allergy. AU - Furuhjelm,Catrin, AU - Warstedt,Kristina, AU - Larsson,Johanna, AU - Fredriksson,Mats, AU - Böttcher,Malin Fagerås, AU - Fälth-Magnusson,Karin, AU - Duchén,Karel, Y1 - 2009/06/01/ PY - 2009/6/4/entrez PY - 2009/6/6/pubmed PY - 2009/10/21/medline SP - 1461 EP - 7 JF - Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) JO - Acta Paediatr. VL - 98 IS - 9 N2 - UNLABELLED: Maternal intake of omega-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) during pregnancy has decreased, possibly contributing to a current increased risk of childhood allergy. AIM: To describe the effects of maternal omega-3 long-chain PUFA supplementation during pregnancy and lactation on the incidence of allergic disease in infancy. METHODS: One hundred and forty-five pregnant women, affected by allergy themselves or having a husband or previous child with allergies, were included in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Daily maternal supplementation with either 1.6 g eicosapentaenoic acid and 1.1 g docosahexaenoic acid or placebo was given from the 25(th) gestational week to average 3-4 months of breastfeeding. Skin prick tests, detection of circulating specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and clinical examinations of the infants were performed. RESULTS: The period prevalence of food allergy was lower in the omega-3 group (1/52, 2%) compared to the placebo group (10/65, 15%, p < 0.05) as well as the incidence of IgE-associated eczema (omega-3 group: 4/52, 8%; placebo group: 15/63, 24%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Maternal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may decrease the risk of food allergy and IgE-associated eczema during the first year of life in infants with a family history of allergic disease. SN - 1651-2227 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19489765/Fish_oil_supplementation_in_pregnancy_and_lactation_may_decrease_the_risk_of_infant_allergy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01355.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -