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Differential effects of restricted versus unlimited high-fat feeding in rats on fat mass, plasma hormones and brain appetite regulators.
J Neuroendocrinol. 2009 Jul; 21(7):602-9.JN

Abstract

The rapid rise in obesity has been linked to altered food consumption patterns. There is increasing evidence that, in addition to total energy intake, the macronutrient composition of the diet may influence the development of obesity. The present study aimed to examine the impact of high dietary fat content, under both isocaloric and hypercaloric conditions, compared with a low fat diet, on adiposity, glucose and lipid metabolism, and brain appetite regulators in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to one of three diets: control (14% fat), ad lib high-fat palatable (HFD, 35% fat) or high-fat palatable restricted (HFD-R, matched to the energy intake of control) and were killed in the fasting state 11 weeks later. Body weight was increased by 28% in unrestricted HFD fed rats, with an almost tripling of caloric intake and fat mass (P < 0.001) and double the plasma triglycerides of controls. Glucose intolerance and increased insulin levels were observed. HFD-R animals calorie matched to control had double their fat mass, plasma insulin and triglycerides (P < 0.05). Only ad lib consumption of the HFD increased the hypothalamic mRNA expression of the appetite-regulating peptides, neuropeptide Y and pro-opiomelanocortin. Although restricted consumption of palatable HFD had no significant impact on hypothalamic appetite regulators or body weight, it increased adiposity and circulating triglycerides, suggesting that the proportion of dietary fat, independent of caloric intake, affects fat deposition and the metabolic profile.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19490368

Citation

Shiraev, T, et al. "Differential Effects of Restricted Versus Unlimited High-fat Feeding in Rats On Fat Mass, Plasma Hormones and Brain Appetite Regulators." Journal of Neuroendocrinology, vol. 21, no. 7, 2009, pp. 602-9.
Shiraev T, Chen H, Morris MJ. Differential effects of restricted versus unlimited high-fat feeding in rats on fat mass, plasma hormones and brain appetite regulators. J Neuroendocrinol. 2009;21(7):602-9.
Shiraev, T., Chen, H., & Morris, M. J. (2009). Differential effects of restricted versus unlimited high-fat feeding in rats on fat mass, plasma hormones and brain appetite regulators. Journal of Neuroendocrinology, 21(7), 602-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2826.2009.01877.x
Shiraev T, Chen H, Morris MJ. Differential Effects of Restricted Versus Unlimited High-fat Feeding in Rats On Fat Mass, Plasma Hormones and Brain Appetite Regulators. J Neuroendocrinol. 2009;21(7):602-9. PubMed PMID: 19490368.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential effects of restricted versus unlimited high-fat feeding in rats on fat mass, plasma hormones and brain appetite regulators. AU - Shiraev,T, AU - Chen,H, AU - Morris,M J, Y1 - 2009/04/13/ PY - 2009/6/4/entrez PY - 2009/6/6/pubmed PY - 2009/9/1/medline SP - 602 EP - 9 JF - Journal of neuroendocrinology JO - J. Neuroendocrinol. VL - 21 IS - 7 N2 - The rapid rise in obesity has been linked to altered food consumption patterns. There is increasing evidence that, in addition to total energy intake, the macronutrient composition of the diet may influence the development of obesity. The present study aimed to examine the impact of high dietary fat content, under both isocaloric and hypercaloric conditions, compared with a low fat diet, on adiposity, glucose and lipid metabolism, and brain appetite regulators in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to one of three diets: control (14% fat), ad lib high-fat palatable (HFD, 35% fat) or high-fat palatable restricted (HFD-R, matched to the energy intake of control) and were killed in the fasting state 11 weeks later. Body weight was increased by 28% in unrestricted HFD fed rats, with an almost tripling of caloric intake and fat mass (P < 0.001) and double the plasma triglycerides of controls. Glucose intolerance and increased insulin levels were observed. HFD-R animals calorie matched to control had double their fat mass, plasma insulin and triglycerides (P < 0.05). Only ad lib consumption of the HFD increased the hypothalamic mRNA expression of the appetite-regulating peptides, neuropeptide Y and pro-opiomelanocortin. Although restricted consumption of palatable HFD had no significant impact on hypothalamic appetite regulators or body weight, it increased adiposity and circulating triglycerides, suggesting that the proportion of dietary fat, independent of caloric intake, affects fat deposition and the metabolic profile. SN - 1365-2826 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19490368/Differential_effects_of_restricted_versus_unlimited_high_fat_feeding_in_rats_on_fat_mass_plasma_hormones_and_brain_appetite_regulators_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2826.2009.01877.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -