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Conjugated linoleic acid intake and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Sep; 90(3):556-60.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies in animals and in vitro suggest that conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), a group of fatty acids found mainly in dairy products and in the meat of ruminants, have protective effects against mammary carcinogenesis. However, findings from epidemiologic studies on CLA intake in relation to breast cancer risk are sparse and inconsistent.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to examine prospectively the association between CLA intake and the incidence of invasive breast cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.

DESIGN

In 1987-1990, 61,433 cancer-free women completed a food-frequency questionnaire from which we estimated each woman's CLA intake. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks, adjusted for breast cancer risk factors.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 17.4 y, 2952 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. In multivariate analyses, no significant association was observed between dietary CLA intake and risk of breast cancer, overall or by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. The multivariate relative risks (95% CI) for the highest quintile of CLA intake (> or =155.7 mg/d) compared with the lowest quintile (<78.1 mg/d) were 1.04 (0.92, 1.17) for overall breast cancer, 1.09 (0.90, 1.31) for ER+/PR+ tumors, 1.09 (0.78, 1.53) for ER+/PR- tumors, and 0.84 (0.57, 1.24) for ER-/PR- tumors.

CONCLUSION

The results provide no evidence of a protective effect of CLA against breast cancer development in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19491389

Citation

Larsson, Susanna C., et al. "Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intake and Breast Cancer Risk in a Prospective Cohort of Swedish Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 90, no. 3, 2009, pp. 556-60.
Larsson SC, Bergkvist L, Wolk A. Conjugated linoleic acid intake and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(3):556-60.
Larsson, S. C., Bergkvist, L., & Wolk, A. (2009). Conjugated linoleic acid intake and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 90(3), 556-60. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27480
Larsson SC, Bergkvist L, Wolk A. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intake and Breast Cancer Risk in a Prospective Cohort of Swedish Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(3):556-60. PubMed PMID: 19491389.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Conjugated linoleic acid intake and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women. AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Bergkvist,Leif, AU - Wolk,Alicja, Y1 - 2009/06/02/ PY - 2009/6/4/entrez PY - 2009/6/6/pubmed PY - 2009/9/30/medline SP - 556 EP - 60 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 90 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies in animals and in vitro suggest that conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), a group of fatty acids found mainly in dairy products and in the meat of ruminants, have protective effects against mammary carcinogenesis. However, findings from epidemiologic studies on CLA intake in relation to breast cancer risk are sparse and inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine prospectively the association between CLA intake and the incidence of invasive breast cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. DESIGN: In 1987-1990, 61,433 cancer-free women completed a food-frequency questionnaire from which we estimated each woman's CLA intake. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks, adjusted for breast cancer risk factors. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 17.4 y, 2952 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained. In multivariate analyses, no significant association was observed between dietary CLA intake and risk of breast cancer, overall or by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status. The multivariate relative risks (95% CI) for the highest quintile of CLA intake (> or =155.7 mg/d) compared with the lowest quintile (<78.1 mg/d) were 1.04 (0.92, 1.17) for overall breast cancer, 1.09 (0.90, 1.31) for ER+/PR+ tumors, 1.09 (0.78, 1.53) for ER+/PR- tumors, and 0.84 (0.57, 1.24) for ER-/PR- tumors. CONCLUSION: The results provide no evidence of a protective effect of CLA against breast cancer development in women. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19491389/Conjugated_linoleic_acid_intake_and_breast_cancer_risk_in_a_prospective_cohort_of_Swedish_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27480 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -