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Bullying and victimization in adolescence: concurrent and stable roles and psychological health symptoms.
J Genet Psychol. 2009 Jun; 170(2):115-33.JG

Abstract

From an initial sample of 1278 Italian students, the authors selected 537 on the basis of their responses to a self-report bully and victim questionnaire. Participants' ages ranged from 13 to 20 years (M = 15.12 years, SD = 1.08 years). The authors compared the concurrent psychological symptoms of 4 participant groups (bullies, victims, bully/victims [i.e., bullies who were also victims of bullying], and uninvolved students). Of participants, 157 were in the bullies group, 140 were in the victims group, 81 were in the bully/victims group, and 159 were in the uninvolved students group. The results show that bullies reported a higher level of externalizing problems, victims reported more internalizing symptoms, and bully/victims reported both a higher level of externalizing problems and more internalizing symptoms. The authors divided the sample into 8 groups on the basis of the students' recollection of their earlier school experiences and of their present role. The authors classified the participants as stable versus late bullies, victims, bully/victims, or uninvolved students. The authors compared each stable group with its corresponding late group and found that stable victims and stable bully/victims reported higher degrees of anxiety, depression, and withdrawal than did the other groups. The authors focus their discussion on the role of chronic peer difficulties in relation to adolescents' symptoms and well-being.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Florence, Department of Psychology, Firenze, Italy. menesini@psico.unifi.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19492729

Citation

Menesini, Ersilia, et al. "Bullying and Victimization in Adolescence: Concurrent and Stable Roles and Psychological Health Symptoms." The Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 170, no. 2, 2009, pp. 115-33.
Menesini E, Modena M, Tani F. Bullying and victimization in adolescence: concurrent and stable roles and psychological health symptoms. J Genet Psychol. 2009;170(2):115-33.
Menesini, E., Modena, M., & Tani, F. (2009). Bullying and victimization in adolescence: concurrent and stable roles and psychological health symptoms. The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 170(2), 115-33. https://doi.org/10.3200/GNTP.170.2.115-134
Menesini E, Modena M, Tani F. Bullying and Victimization in Adolescence: Concurrent and Stable Roles and Psychological Health Symptoms. J Genet Psychol. 2009;170(2):115-33. PubMed PMID: 19492729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bullying and victimization in adolescence: concurrent and stable roles and psychological health symptoms. AU - Menesini,Ersilia, AU - Modena,Marco, AU - Tani,Franca, PY - 2009/6/5/entrez PY - 2009/6/6/pubmed PY - 2009/6/12/medline SP - 115 EP - 33 JF - The Journal of genetic psychology JO - J Genet Psychol VL - 170 IS - 2 N2 - From an initial sample of 1278 Italian students, the authors selected 537 on the basis of their responses to a self-report bully and victim questionnaire. Participants' ages ranged from 13 to 20 years (M = 15.12 years, SD = 1.08 years). The authors compared the concurrent psychological symptoms of 4 participant groups (bullies, victims, bully/victims [i.e., bullies who were also victims of bullying], and uninvolved students). Of participants, 157 were in the bullies group, 140 were in the victims group, 81 were in the bully/victims group, and 159 were in the uninvolved students group. The results show that bullies reported a higher level of externalizing problems, victims reported more internalizing symptoms, and bully/victims reported both a higher level of externalizing problems and more internalizing symptoms. The authors divided the sample into 8 groups on the basis of the students' recollection of their earlier school experiences and of their present role. The authors classified the participants as stable versus late bullies, victims, bully/victims, or uninvolved students. The authors compared each stable group with its corresponding late group and found that stable victims and stable bully/victims reported higher degrees of anxiety, depression, and withdrawal than did the other groups. The authors focus their discussion on the role of chronic peer difficulties in relation to adolescents' symptoms and well-being. SN - 0022-1325 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19492729/Bullying_and_victimization_in_adolescence:_concurrent_and_stable_roles_and_psychological_health_symptoms_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3200/GNTP.170.2.115-134 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -