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Kava hepatotoxicity: comparison of aqueous, ethanolic, acetonic kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jun 25; 123(3):378-84.JE

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE

Ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts have previously been causally related to rare hepatotoxicity observed in patients from Germany and Switzerland, but causality assessment was not performed in cases of patients having taken the traditional aqueous kava extracts of South Pacific islands or kava-herbs mixtures.

AIM OF THE STUDY

To study the possible hepatotoxicity of aqueous kava extracts of the South Pacific Islands.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Causality of hepatotoxicity by aqueous kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures was assessed, using the updated score of the quantitative CIOMS (Council for the International Organizations of Medical Sciences).

RESULTS

Causality was established in five patients from New Caledonia, Australia, the United States and Germany for aqueous kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures. A comparison with 9 patients from Germany and Switzerland with established causality of hepatotoxicity by ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts reveals that the clinical picture in all 14 patients is similar, independently whether aqueous, ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts or kava-herbs mixtures were used.

CONCLUSIONS

Kava hepatotoxicity occurs also with traditional aqueous kava extracts of the South Pacific islands and thereby independently from ethanol or acetone as chemical solvents, suggesting that the toxicity is linked to the kava plant itself with a possibly low quality of the used kava cultivar or kava plant part rather than to chemical solvents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Klinikum Hanau, Teaching Hospital of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University of Frankfurt/Main, Leimenstrasse 20, D-63450 Hanau, Germany. rolf-teschke@klinikum-hanau.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19501269

Citation

Teschke, Rolf, et al. "Kava Hepatotoxicity: Comparison of Aqueous, Ethanolic, Acetonic Kava Extracts and Kava-herbs Mixtures." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 123, no. 3, 2009, pp. 378-84.
Teschke R, Genthner A, Wolff A. Kava hepatotoxicity: comparison of aqueous, ethanolic, acetonic kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009;123(3):378-84.
Teschke, R., Genthner, A., & Wolff, A. (2009). Kava hepatotoxicity: comparison of aqueous, ethanolic, acetonic kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3), 378-84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.038
Teschke R, Genthner A, Wolff A. Kava Hepatotoxicity: Comparison of Aqueous, Ethanolic, Acetonic Kava Extracts and Kava-herbs Mixtures. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jun 25;123(3):378-84. PubMed PMID: 19501269.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Kava hepatotoxicity: comparison of aqueous, ethanolic, acetonic kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures. AU - Teschke,Rolf, AU - Genthner,Alexander, AU - Wolff,Albrecht, Y1 - 2009/04/05/ PY - 2008/10/09/received PY - 2009/03/17/revised PY - 2009/03/20/accepted PY - 2009/6/9/entrez PY - 2009/6/9/pubmed PY - 2009/10/9/medline SP - 378 EP - 84 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 123 IS - 3 N2 - ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts have previously been causally related to rare hepatotoxicity observed in patients from Germany and Switzerland, but causality assessment was not performed in cases of patients having taken the traditional aqueous kava extracts of South Pacific islands or kava-herbs mixtures. AIM OF THE STUDY: To study the possible hepatotoxicity of aqueous kava extracts of the South Pacific Islands. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Causality of hepatotoxicity by aqueous kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures was assessed, using the updated score of the quantitative CIOMS (Council for the International Organizations of Medical Sciences). RESULTS: Causality was established in five patients from New Caledonia, Australia, the United States and Germany for aqueous kava extracts and kava-herbs mixtures. A comparison with 9 patients from Germany and Switzerland with established causality of hepatotoxicity by ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts reveals that the clinical picture in all 14 patients is similar, independently whether aqueous, ethanolic and acetonic kava extracts or kava-herbs mixtures were used. CONCLUSIONS: Kava hepatotoxicity occurs also with traditional aqueous kava extracts of the South Pacific islands and thereby independently from ethanol or acetone as chemical solvents, suggesting that the toxicity is linked to the kava plant itself with a possibly low quality of the used kava cultivar or kava plant part rather than to chemical solvents. SN - 1872-7573 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19501269/Kava_hepatotoxicity:_comparison_of_aqueous_ethanolic_acetonic_kava_extracts_and_kava_herbs_mixtures_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(09)00194-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -