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Green tea consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies.
Gut. 2009 Oct; 58(10):1323-32.Gut

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous experimental studies have suggested many possible anti-cancer mechanisms for green tea, but epidemiological evidence for the effect of green tea consumption on gastric cancer risk is conflicting.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between green tea consumption and gastric cancer.

METHODS

We analysed original data from six cohort studies that measured green tea consumption using validated questionnaires at baseline. Hazard ratios (HRs) in the individual studies were calculated, with adjustment for a common set of variables, and combined using a random-effects model.

RESULTS

During 2 285 968 person-years of follow-up for a total of 219 080 subjects, 3577 cases of gastric cancer were identified. Compared with those drinking <1 cup/day, no significant risk reduction for gastric cancer was observed with increased green tea consumption in men, even in stratified analyses by smoking status and subsite. In women, however, a significantly decreased risk was observed for those with consumption of > or =5 cups/day (multivariate-adjusted pooled HR = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65 to 0.96). This decrease was also significant for the distal subsite (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.50 to 0.96). In contrast, a lack of association for proximal gastric cancer was consistently seen in both men and women.

CONCLUSIONS

Green tea may decrease the risk of distal gastric cancer in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 Japan. mnminoue@ncc.go.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19505880

Citation

Inoue, M, et al. "Green Tea Consumption and Gastric Cancer in Japanese: a Pooled Analysis of Six Cohort Studies." Gut, vol. 58, no. 10, 2009, pp. 1323-32.
Inoue M, Sasazuki S, Wakai K, et al. Green tea consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies. Gut. 2009;58(10):1323-32.
Inoue, M., Sasazuki, S., Wakai, K., Suzuki, T., Matsuo, K., Shimazu, T., Tsuji, I., Tanaka, K., Mizoue, T., Nagata, C., Tamakoshi, A., Sawada, N., & Tsugane, S. (2009). Green tea consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies. Gut, 58(10), 1323-32. https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.2008.166710
Inoue M, et al. Green Tea Consumption and Gastric Cancer in Japanese: a Pooled Analysis of Six Cohort Studies. Gut. 2009;58(10):1323-32. PubMed PMID: 19505880.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Green tea consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies. AU - Inoue,M, AU - Sasazuki,S, AU - Wakai,K, AU - Suzuki,T, AU - Matsuo,K, AU - Shimazu,T, AU - Tsuji,I, AU - Tanaka,K, AU - Mizoue,T, AU - Nagata,C, AU - Tamakoshi,A, AU - Sawada,N, AU - Tsugane,S, AU - ,, Y1 - 2009/06/07/ PY - 2009/6/10/entrez PY - 2009/6/10/pubmed PY - 2009/11/17/medline SP - 1323 EP - 32 JF - Gut JO - Gut VL - 58 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous experimental studies have suggested many possible anti-cancer mechanisms for green tea, but epidemiological evidence for the effect of green tea consumption on gastric cancer risk is conflicting. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between green tea consumption and gastric cancer. METHODS: We analysed original data from six cohort studies that measured green tea consumption using validated questionnaires at baseline. Hazard ratios (HRs) in the individual studies were calculated, with adjustment for a common set of variables, and combined using a random-effects model. RESULTS: During 2 285 968 person-years of follow-up for a total of 219 080 subjects, 3577 cases of gastric cancer were identified. Compared with those drinking <1 cup/day, no significant risk reduction for gastric cancer was observed with increased green tea consumption in men, even in stratified analyses by smoking status and subsite. In women, however, a significantly decreased risk was observed for those with consumption of > or =5 cups/day (multivariate-adjusted pooled HR = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65 to 0.96). This decrease was also significant for the distal subsite (HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.50 to 0.96). In contrast, a lack of association for proximal gastric cancer was consistently seen in both men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Green tea may decrease the risk of distal gastric cancer in women. SN - 1468-3288 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19505880/Green_tea_consumption_and_gastric_cancer_in_Japanese:_a_pooled_analysis_of_six_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://gut.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19505880 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -