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Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2009 Aug; 69(2):274-87.FM

Abstract

Interactions between host tree species and ectomycorrhizal fungi are important in structuring ectomycorrhizal communities, but there are only a few studies on host influence of congeneric trees. We investigated ectomycorrhizal community assemblages on roots of deciduous Quercus crassifolia and evergreen Quercus laurina in a tropical montane cloud forest, one of the most endangered tropical forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing internal transcribed spacer and partial 28S rRNA gene. We sampled 80 soil cores and documented high ectomycorrhizal diversity with a total of 154 taxa. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that oak host was significant in explaining some of the variation in ectomycorrhizal communities, despite the fact that the two Quercus species belong to the same red oak lineage (section Lobatae). A Tuber species, found in 23% of the soil cores, was the most frequent taxon. Similar to oak-dominated ectomycorrhizal communities in temperate forests, Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales were diverse and dominant.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA. mhmorris@ucdavis.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19508503

Citation

Morris, Melissa H., et al. "Influence of Host Species On Ectomycorrhizal Communities Associated With Two Co-occurring Oaks (Quercus Spp.) in a Tropical Cloud Forest." FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 69, no. 2, 2009, pp. 274-87.
Morris MH, Pérez-Pérez MA, Smith ME, et al. Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2009;69(2):274-87.
Morris, M. H., Pérez-Pérez, M. A., Smith, M. E., & Bledsoe, C. S. (2009). Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 69(2), 274-87. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2009.00704.x
Morris MH, et al. Influence of Host Species On Ectomycorrhizal Communities Associated With Two Co-occurring Oaks (Quercus Spp.) in a Tropical Cloud Forest. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2009;69(2):274-87. PubMed PMID: 19508503.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest. AU - Morris,Melissa H, AU - Pérez-Pérez,Miguel A, AU - Smith,Matthew E, AU - Bledsoe,Caroline S, Y1 - 2009/05/06/ PY - 2009/6/11/entrez PY - 2009/6/11/pubmed PY - 2009/9/1/medline SP - 274 EP - 87 JF - FEMS microbiology ecology JO - FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. VL - 69 IS - 2 N2 - Interactions between host tree species and ectomycorrhizal fungi are important in structuring ectomycorrhizal communities, but there are only a few studies on host influence of congeneric trees. We investigated ectomycorrhizal community assemblages on roots of deciduous Quercus crassifolia and evergreen Quercus laurina in a tropical montane cloud forest, one of the most endangered tropical forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing internal transcribed spacer and partial 28S rRNA gene. We sampled 80 soil cores and documented high ectomycorrhizal diversity with a total of 154 taxa. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that oak host was significant in explaining some of the variation in ectomycorrhizal communities, despite the fact that the two Quercus species belong to the same red oak lineage (section Lobatae). A Tuber species, found in 23% of the soil cores, was the most frequent taxon. Similar to oak-dominated ectomycorrhizal communities in temperate forests, Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales were diverse and dominant. SN - 1574-6941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19508503/Influence_of_host_species_on_ectomycorrhizal_communities_associated_with_two_co_occurring_oaks__Quercus_spp___in_a_tropical_cloud_forest_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/femsec/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2009.00704.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -