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The glycemic index: methodology and clinical implications.
Am J Clin Nutr 1991; 54(5):846-54AJ

Abstract

There is controversy regarding the clinical utility of classifying foods according to their glycemic responses by using the glycemic index (GI). Part of the controversy is due to methodologic variables that can markedly affect the interpretation of glycemic responses and the GI values obtained. Recent studies support the clinical utility of the GI. Within limits determined by the expected GI difference and by the day-to-day variation of glycemic responses, the GI predicts the ranking of the glycemic potential of different meals in individual subjects. In long-term trials, low-GI diets result in modest improvements in overall blood glucose control in patients with insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Of perhaps greater therapeutic importance is the ability of low-GI diets to reduce insulin secretion and lower blood lipid concentrations in patients with hypertriglyceridemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1951155

Citation

Wolever, T M., et al. "The Glycemic Index: Methodology and Clinical Implications." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 5, 1991, pp. 846-54.
Wolever TM, Jenkins DJ, Jenkins AL, et al. The glycemic index: methodology and clinical implications. Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;54(5):846-54.
Wolever, T. M., Jenkins, D. J., Jenkins, A. L., & Josse, R. G. (1991). The glycemic index: methodology and clinical implications. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 54(5), pp. 846-54.
Wolever TM, et al. The Glycemic Index: Methodology and Clinical Implications. Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;54(5):846-54. PubMed PMID: 1951155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The glycemic index: methodology and clinical implications. AU - Wolever,T M, AU - Jenkins,D J, AU - Jenkins,A L, AU - Josse,R G, PY - 1991/11/1/pubmed PY - 1991/11/1/medline PY - 1991/11/1/entrez SP - 846 EP - 54 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 54 IS - 5 N2 - There is controversy regarding the clinical utility of classifying foods according to their glycemic responses by using the glycemic index (GI). Part of the controversy is due to methodologic variables that can markedly affect the interpretation of glycemic responses and the GI values obtained. Recent studies support the clinical utility of the GI. Within limits determined by the expected GI difference and by the day-to-day variation of glycemic responses, the GI predicts the ranking of the glycemic potential of different meals in individual subjects. In long-term trials, low-GI diets result in modest improvements in overall blood glucose control in patients with insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Of perhaps greater therapeutic importance is the ability of low-GI diets to reduce insulin secretion and lower blood lipid concentrations in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1951155/The_glycemic_index:_methodology_and_clinical_implications_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/54.5.846 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -