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Low-dose propofol sedation for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy: results in 10,662 adults.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2009 Jul; 104(7):1650-5.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The use of propofol sedation during endoscopic procedures has increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of nurse-administered low-dose propofol sedation for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).

METHODS

We prospectively assessed the outcome and complications of low-dose bolus propofol for endoscopic sedation for diagnostic EGD. Propofol was administered by bolus injection, with a standard protocol of 40 mg for patients <70 years old, 30 mg for patients 70-89 years old, and 20 mg for patients 90 years or older. When required for adequate sedation, additional doses were given, to a maximum of 120 mg. The primary outcome measure was respiratory depression, defined as oxygen desaturation (SpO(2) <90%) that continued for more than 20 s. Secondary measures included successful procedures, full recovery within 60 min of the procedure, and complications.

RESULTS

All procedures were successful; 8,431 of 10,662 patients (79.1%) completed diagnostic EGD with a single bolus of propofol. Only 0.26% (28 patients) required transient supplemental oxygen supply; neither mask ventilation nor endotracheal intubation was required. Full recovery occurred in 99.9% of patients 60 min after the procedure. Men and younger patients required significantly higher doses of propofol than did the women and older patients (men vs. women, 46.5+/-19 vs. 42.7+/-15 mg, P=0.0008; age 40-49 vs. age 50-59, 51.5+/-16 vs. 46.3+/-13 mg, P<0.0001). Of the 400 patients, 368 (92%) wanted to drive home or to their offices, and all did so without incident. A total of 99% were willing to repeat the same procedure again.

CONCLUSIONS

Low-dose nurse-administered propofol sedation is safe and practical for diagnostic EGD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Showa Inan General Hospital, Komagane, Japan. horiuchi.akira@sihp.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19513021

Citation

Horiuchi, Akira, et al. "Low-dose Propofol Sedation for Diagnostic Esophagogastroduodenoscopy: Results in 10,662 Adults." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 104, no. 7, 2009, pp. 1650-5.
Horiuchi A, Nakayama Y, Hidaka N, et al. Low-dose propofol sedation for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy: results in 10,662 adults. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009;104(7):1650-5.
Horiuchi, A., Nakayama, Y., Hidaka, N., Ichise, Y., Kajiyama, M., & Tanaka, N. (2009). Low-dose propofol sedation for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy: results in 10,662 adults. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 104(7), 1650-5. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2009.250
Horiuchi A, et al. Low-dose Propofol Sedation for Diagnostic Esophagogastroduodenoscopy: Results in 10,662 Adults. Am J Gastroenterol. 2009;104(7):1650-5. PubMed PMID: 19513021.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-dose propofol sedation for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy: results in 10,662 adults. AU - Horiuchi,Akira, AU - Nakayama,Yoshiko, AU - Hidaka,Nao, AU - Ichise,Yasuyuki, AU - Kajiyama,Masashi, AU - Tanaka,Naoki, Y1 - 2009/06/09/ PY - 2009/6/11/entrez PY - 2009/6/11/pubmed PY - 2009/7/25/medline SP - 1650 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 104 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The use of propofol sedation during endoscopic procedures has increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of nurse-administered low-dose propofol sedation for diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). METHODS: We prospectively assessed the outcome and complications of low-dose bolus propofol for endoscopic sedation for diagnostic EGD. Propofol was administered by bolus injection, with a standard protocol of 40 mg for patients <70 years old, 30 mg for patients 70-89 years old, and 20 mg for patients 90 years or older. When required for adequate sedation, additional doses were given, to a maximum of 120 mg. The primary outcome measure was respiratory depression, defined as oxygen desaturation (SpO(2) <90%) that continued for more than 20 s. Secondary measures included successful procedures, full recovery within 60 min of the procedure, and complications. RESULTS: All procedures were successful; 8,431 of 10,662 patients (79.1%) completed diagnostic EGD with a single bolus of propofol. Only 0.26% (28 patients) required transient supplemental oxygen supply; neither mask ventilation nor endotracheal intubation was required. Full recovery occurred in 99.9% of patients 60 min after the procedure. Men and younger patients required significantly higher doses of propofol than did the women and older patients (men vs. women, 46.5+/-19 vs. 42.7+/-15 mg, P=0.0008; age 40-49 vs. age 50-59, 51.5+/-16 vs. 46.3+/-13 mg, P<0.0001). Of the 400 patients, 368 (92%) wanted to drive home or to their offices, and all did so without incident. A total of 99% were willing to repeat the same procedure again. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose nurse-administered propofol sedation is safe and practical for diagnostic EGD. SN - 1572-0241 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19513021/Low_dose_propofol_sedation_for_diagnostic_esophagogastroduodenoscopy:_results_in_10662_adults_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -