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Relationship of ankle-brachial index with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality after a 3-year follow-up: the China ankle-brachial index cohort study.
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Feb; 24(2):111-6.JH

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the relationship of ankle-brachial index (ABI) with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in Chinese inpatients after 3 years of follow-up. All the participants were inpatients at high risk of atherosclerosis and enrolled from July to November 2004. A total of 3210 patients were followed up until an end point was reached or until February 2008. The mean follow-up time was 37.65+/-1.54 months. Patients with ABI <or=0.4 were significantly older than other ABI categories (P<0.001) at baseline. The all-cause and CV disease (CVD) mortality were highest (37.7 and 27.5%, respectively) after a 3-year follow-up in patients with ABI <or=0.4. There was a significant increasing tendency in mortality with decreasing ABI levels (P<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier curves of survival showed a decreasing survival rate with the ABI decreasing, not only for all-cause mortality but also for CVD mortality (P<0.001). Adjusted for other risk factors, patients with ABI <or=0.4 were 3.105 times (95% CI 1.936-4.979) as likely to die as those with ABI in the range of 1.00-1.4; patients with ABI <or=0.4 were about five times (95% CI 2.740-8.388) as likely to die of CVD as those with ABI in the range of 1.00-1.4. Even patients with ABI in the range of 0.41-0.90 were more than 1.5 times as likely to die (relative risk=1.534, 95% CI 1.199-1.962), or die of CVD (relative risk=2.031, 95% CI 1.479-2.789) as those with ABI in the range of 1.00-1.4. Low ABI is related to a higher all-cause and CV mortality compared with normal ABI. ABI as a marker of atherosclerosis should be routinely evaluated to assess the risk of CV mortality in Chinese patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19516270

Citation

Li, X, et al. "Relationship of Ankle-brachial Index With All-cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Mortality After a 3-year Follow-up: the China Ankle-brachial Index Cohort Study." Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 24, no. 2, 2010, pp. 111-6.
Li X, Luo Y, Xu Y, et al. Relationship of ankle-brachial index with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality after a 3-year follow-up: the China ankle-brachial index cohort study. J Hum Hypertens. 2010;24(2):111-6.
Li, X., Luo, Y., Xu, Y., Li, J., & Hu, D. (2010). Relationship of ankle-brachial index with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality after a 3-year follow-up: the China ankle-brachial index cohort study. Journal of Human Hypertension, 24(2), 111-6. https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2009.49
Li X, et al. Relationship of Ankle-brachial Index With All-cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Mortality After a 3-year Follow-up: the China Ankle-brachial Index Cohort Study. J Hum Hypertens. 2010;24(2):111-6. PubMed PMID: 19516270.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship of ankle-brachial index with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality after a 3-year follow-up: the China ankle-brachial index cohort study. AU - Li,X, AU - Luo,Y, AU - Xu,Y, AU - Li,J, AU - Hu,D, Y1 - 2009/06/11/ PY - 2009/6/12/entrez PY - 2009/6/12/pubmed PY - 2010/3/12/medline SP - 111 EP - 6 JF - Journal of human hypertension JO - J Hum Hypertens VL - 24 IS - 2 N2 - This study aimed to investigate the relationship of ankle-brachial index (ABI) with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in Chinese inpatients after 3 years of follow-up. All the participants were inpatients at high risk of atherosclerosis and enrolled from July to November 2004. A total of 3210 patients were followed up until an end point was reached or until February 2008. The mean follow-up time was 37.65+/-1.54 months. Patients with ABI <or=0.4 were significantly older than other ABI categories (P<0.001) at baseline. The all-cause and CV disease (CVD) mortality were highest (37.7 and 27.5%, respectively) after a 3-year follow-up in patients with ABI <or=0.4. There was a significant increasing tendency in mortality with decreasing ABI levels (P<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier curves of survival showed a decreasing survival rate with the ABI decreasing, not only for all-cause mortality but also for CVD mortality (P<0.001). Adjusted for other risk factors, patients with ABI <or=0.4 were 3.105 times (95% CI 1.936-4.979) as likely to die as those with ABI in the range of 1.00-1.4; patients with ABI <or=0.4 were about five times (95% CI 2.740-8.388) as likely to die of CVD as those with ABI in the range of 1.00-1.4. Even patients with ABI in the range of 0.41-0.90 were more than 1.5 times as likely to die (relative risk=1.534, 95% CI 1.199-1.962), or die of CVD (relative risk=2.031, 95% CI 1.479-2.789) as those with ABI in the range of 1.00-1.4. Low ABI is related to a higher all-cause and CV mortality compared with normal ABI. ABI as a marker of atherosclerosis should be routinely evaluated to assess the risk of CV mortality in Chinese patients. SN - 1476-5527 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19516270/Relationship_of_ankle_brachial_index_with_all_cause_mortality_and_cardiovascular_mortality_after_a_3_year_follow_up:_the_China_ankle_brachial_index_cohort_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2009.49 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -